BLS Staff Member Receives Prestigious Honor

Daniell Toth

ASA Fellow Daniell Toth

One of the things I love about leading BLS is working with so many dedicated and talented professionals, who care deeply about the quality of the statistics we publish. One of our colleagues recently was recognized for his good work. All of us at BLS congratulate Daniell Toth, a research mathematical statistician in the Office of Survey Methods Research, who was selected as a Fellow of the American Statistical Association.

Only one-third of one percent of the ASA’s membership receives this prestigious distinction. Daniell has been honored for outstanding contributions to survey methods. Among these contributions are better methods for designing survey samples and assessing and reducing the bias that can result from survey nonresponse. The honor also recognizes Daniell’s research on methods to protect the confidentiality of survey respondents. In addition to Daniell’s important research, the ASA recognized his long service to support junior statisticians and researchers, the broader statistical community, and the ASA itself. Congratulations, Daniell!

Put Your Writing Skills to Work

Editor’s note: This post was written by Alan Zilberman, an economist at the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

There are countless ways for people to express themselves through the written word. Social media, blogs, comment boards, and even private diaries are a way to flex the writing muscle. Most writers are happy to offer their thoughts for free, but the sheer quantity of media outlets and demand for content creates opportunities in occupations that put writing skills to work.

Writing occupations communicate ideas and concepts through written language. Let’s take a closer look at some of them.

  • Writers and authors compose everything from novels to blog posts. They also write short stories, advertising copy, movie or TV scripts, and plays.
  • Reporters and correspondents, also known as journalists, include workers that write articles for newspapers, magazines, or Internet publications such as online only news services. They may report the news or offer their own opinions.
  • Editors plan, assign, and review everything from newspaper articles to novels. They review writing for syntax, spelling, and “bigger picture” concerns like style and storytelling.

All of these occupations are projected to have job openings in 2024, and all typically require a bachelor’s degree for entry, usually in English, journalism, or communications.

Writing occupation employment, wages, and projected job openings
Occupation 2014 Employment Percent self employed in 2014 Job openings due to growth and replacements,
2014–24
Median annual wage, 2016 Typical education needed for entry

Reporters and correspondents

49,300 14.8% 15,900 $37,820 Bachelor’s degree

Editors

117,200 13.6% 42,500 $57,210 Bachelor’s degree

Writers and authors

136,500 65.7% 26,100 $61,240 Bachelor’s degree

About two-thirds of writers and authors were self-employed in 2014, as were about 1 in 6 editors and reporters and correspondents. Most wage and salary workers in these occupations work in publishing industries, such as magazines, newspapers, or book publishers. People who write and edit for a living can often do so from their homes.

Median annual wages for these occupations ranged from $61,240 for writers and authors, to $57,210 for editors, to $37,820 for reporters and correspondents. (Wages are for May 2016. These wages do not include self-employed workers.) Wages for reporters and correspondents are much higher in metropolitan areas where many publishers are based, such as the New York and Washington, DC, metropolitan areas.

In order to get their work published, a writer or journalist typically proposes an assignment, also known as a “pitch,” to the appropriate editor. Editors are the gatekeepers for the outlets where they work; they read pitches, decide which ones are best for their readers, and approve them accordingly. Editors also take a writer’s initial draft and improve it so it is clearer and more evocative. By researching what editors want, writers can develop a portfolio of their “clips,” which will then increase their chances to build their writing careers. A newer alternative for writers and journalists to get their work published is to self-publish on the Internet, such as in a blog or in an e-book marketplace. If a blog or e-book gains enough attention or popularity, self-published writers could transition into more lucrative writing deals.

Explore all of these occupations and many more in the Occupational Outlook Handbook.

The Growing Need for Eldercare Workers

Editor’s note: The following has been cross-posted from the U.S. Department of Labor blog. The writer is Emily Rolen, an economist at the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Tens of millions of babies were born in the United States between 1946 and 1964, and by 2024, nearly 70 million people will be between the ages of 60 and 78. People age 65 and older are projected to make up 23 percent of the civilian noninstitutional population in 2024, up from 18.1 percent in 2014 and 15.5 percent in 2004. As the population ages, they’ll need more workers to care for them in nursing care facilities, retirement communities, or at home.

As a result, occupations related to eldercare are projected to be among the fastest growing in the economy over the next decade. In fact, home health aides, personal care aides, registered nurses, nursing assistants and LPNs/LVNs are projected to add more than 1.6 million new jobs by 2024, or about 1 in 6 new jobs added to the economy. Let’s take a closer look at some of these jobs.

A graphic showing projected growth in eldercare-related healthcare occupations to 2024

Home health aides and personal care aides help older adults, as well as people with disabilities or cognitive impairment, with self-care and everyday tasks like bathing, housekeeping and meal preparation. Home health aides also provide basic health-related services, such as checking vital signs or administering prescribed medications. However, personal care aides cannot provide any medical services. Both occupations work in clients’ homes, long-term care settings, and residential care communities.

Home health aides and personal care aides typically do not need formal education, but most have a high school diploma or equivalent. Both learn their jobs through a brief period of on-the-job training. Home health aides are projected to be the fifth-fastest growing occupation between 2014 and 2024, with more than 348,000 new jobs. Personal care aides are projected to add more than 458,000 new jobs between 2014 and 2024, more than any other occupation.

Nursing assistants and licensed practical nurses and licensed vocational nurses work primarily in nursing homes and in hospitals, where they provide basic care. They help patients with activities of daily living, such as bathing, using the toilet and getting dressed. Nursing assistants and LPNs/LVNs listen to their patients, record health concerns and report that information to registered nurses and doctors. Depending on their work setting and the state in which they work, LPNs/LVNs may be allowed to perform additional tasks such as giving medication, starting intravenous drips, or doing routine laboratory tests.

Nursing assistants and LPNs/LVNs typically need a postsecondary nondegree award to enter the occupation. LPNs/LVNs must also have a license. The economy is projected to add 262,000 new nursing assistant jobs by 2024, and LPNs/LVNs are projected to increase by more than 117,000.

Registered nurses, the largest healthcare occupation, provide and coordinate medical care. In 2014 more than 3 in 5 RNs worked in hospitals. They observe patients, help perform diagnostic tests and analyze the results, and set up plans for patients’ care. Some registered nurses oversee licensed practical nurses, nursing assistants, and home health aides.

RNs are projected to add 439,300 by 2024, the largest increase after personal care aides. RNs usually take one of three education paths: a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree, an associate’s degree in nursing, or a diploma from an approved nursing program.

Want to know more? Explore these occupations and many more in the Occupational Outlook Handbook.

Now on Video: Finding Better Ways to Talk about Data

Our mission at BLS is to help people understand what’s going on in the labor market and the economy. Since our founding in 1884, we’ve aided that understanding by improving our products. We didn’t start with stone tablets, but we have produced mountains of paper and its electronic equivalent in 133 years. Whether it’s news releases or articles or bulletins, most of our output includes text, tables, and, more recently, graphics. Recently we have added another medium to our library, using video to tell stories about our data. We are pleased to introduce you to “Beth’s Bird Houses,” “What if there were only 100 jobs in the United States,” and more, now available on video.

Why video? Video lets us provide a large amount of information in a shorter time. We know you are busy, and we want to use your time wisely. We will always need written words and tables and charts to provide the details of our economic analyses and survey methods, but video helps us provide the main points more quickly. Video is also easy to share through social media, helping us reach more people.

The first video we produced is about our statistics on productivity. Productivity statistics are among the most technically complex data we produce. Despite their complexity, we believe it’s important to understand productivity statistics because productivity directly affects workers’ pay and the nation’s standard of living. We produced a video that explains in about 2 minutes the essential elements of productivity statistics. How’s that for being productive? Check it out and let us know how you enjoy it.

We recently posted two videos about the Employment Cost Index, which measures changes in the costs to employers of worker pay and benefits. One video explains what the Employment Cost Index is. The other video explains how the Employment Cost Index is used.

Want to know more about the different types of jobs workers have in the United States? What about workplace hazards and the safety of America’s workers? We have new videos on those subjects too, and we expect to keep adding to the list to keep you informed. You can see all of our videos on our video page.

Our customers use BLS information to support their private and public decision making. Our mission is to remain relevant to a diverse set of data users regardless of their technical expertise. We believe it’s important not just to tell people what the numbers are but to explain what they mean and where they come from. Video gives us new opportunities to reach a wider audience with our information. As they say in the movies, roll ‘em.

Why This Counts: Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey

Looking solely at net employment change is similar to looking at the surface of a lake. You’ll see ripples and changes, but there’s a whole lot of activity going on underneath the surface. Using JOLTS data—the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey—provides a peek at what’s going on below the surface of net employment change.

The basics

JOLTS is a monthly survey of 16,000 establishments that asks employers to provide information on the number of job openings (as of the last business day of the month) and the total number of hires and separations that occurred throughout the month. By asking for the total number of hires and separations over the entire month, we can get a sense of just how many jobs started and ended within a month. For example, in February 2017 there were 5.3 million hires and 5.1 million separations. That’s approximately the population of Colorado moving in and out of jobs in a single month!

A chart showing trends in the numbers of hires and job separations from 2007 to 2017.

Editor’s note: A text-only version of the graphic is below.

Understanding the churn

You may be familiar with the headline payroll employment number that comes out each month, with information on how many net jobs were gained or lost. However, JOLTS data give us insight on what goes on beyond the monthly employment data. JOLTS data show us just how dynamic the U.S. labor market is and can illuminate which industries have persistent unmet demand for workers.

Movement into and out of jobs is often called “churn.” As the rates of hires and separations climb, this increased “churn” can signal a healthy labor market where workers can move in and out of jobs with relative ease. Similarly, when rates of hires and separations fall, workers may have more difficulty moving from job to job.

JOLTS data can also give us insight into labor market changes before the net employment figures can. In the last recession, the hiring rate started to decelerate before payroll employment slowed.

Further insight into industries

Labor market activity differs by industry. By using the combination of hires and job openings rates, we can explore which industries have persistent low-level demand for workers and which industries may have a high unmet demand for workers. When the openings rate exceeds the hiring rate, the industry has an unmet demand for workers.

Consider jobs in construction, retail trade, and accommodation and food services. There are fewer job openings than hires in these industries, suggesting that employers can easily find workers. Many jobs in these industries require minimal training or experience, which means it is easy to find workers. It may also mean that workers don’t stay with one employer for very long. JOLTS data confirm this. These industries have high churn, with large numbers of hires and large numbers of separations. Trends in hires and separations tend to move together, meaning employers are frequently replacing workers.

A chart showing hires rates and job separations rates in construction, retail trade, and accommodation and food service from 2007 to 2017.

Editor’s note: A text-only version of the graphic is below.

In contrast, many jobs in health care and financial activities require more training and experience, suggesting it may be more difficult to find qualified workers. In these industries, job openings are greater than hires—employers are always looking for qualified workers. These industries also exhibit low churn, stemming from low numbers of hires and separations as a share of industry employment. This suggests workers remain with their employers for longer periods of time.

The professional and business services industry presents an unusual case, perhaps because of the diverse set of occupations within the industry. Included in this industry are many professional service workers, such as those in computer service and engineering firms. But the industry also includes temporary help supply firms and building services, such as janitorial and landscaping firms. Until recently, the industry as a whole had traditionally had more hires than job openings, suggesting an ease in attracting labor. This may be due in part to the number of lower-skilled jobs in this industry. But several times over the past year, job openings have exceeded hires, suggesting that employers need qualified workers. Perhaps this reflects the higher-skilled jobs in this industry. This recent trend bears watching.

A chart showing hires rates and job separations rates in financial activities, health care, and professional and business services from 2007 to 2017.

Editor’s note: A text-only version of the graphic is below.

Jobs in government and education exhibit both low hiring and low job openings rates. These lower rates indicate that few workers are needed in these industries—workers may tend to stay in these jobs for long periods of time.

For more info on JOLTS, see www.bls.gov/jlt. For more in-depth information on the interaction between job openings and hires, see Charlotte Oslund’s article, “Which industries need workers? Exploring differences in labor market activity.”

 

Number of hires and separations, February 2007 to February 2017, seasonally adjusted
Month Hires Separations
Feb 2007 5,202,000 5,094,000
Mar 2007 5,380,000 5,123,000
Apr 2007 5,158,000 5,138,000
May 2007 5,268,000 5,080,000
Jun 2007 5,187,000 5,065,000
Jul 2007 5,075,000 5,118,000
Aug 2007 5,106,000 5,105,000
Sep 2007 5,145,000 5,031,000
Oct 2007 5,227,000 5,129,000
Nov 2007 5,162,000 5,031,000
Dec 2007 4,968,000 4,926,000
Jan 2008 4,868,000 5,005,000
Feb 2008 4,943,000 5,010,000
Mar 2008 4,766,000 4,762,000
Apr 2008 4,875,000 5,121,000
May 2008 4,602,000 4,728,000
Jun 2008 4,751,000 4,900,000
Jul 2008 4,471,000 4,713,000
Aug 2008 4,522,000 4,815,000
Sep 2008 4,316,000 4,751,000
Oct 2008 4,454,000 4,895,000
Nov 2008 3,954,000 4,605,000
Dec 2008 4,218,000 4,814,000
Jan 2009 4,158,000 4,974,000
Feb 2009 4,011,000 4,674,000
Mar 2009 3,730,000 4,536,000
Apr 2009 3,853,000 4,655,000
May 2009 3,793,000 4,146,000
Jun 2009 3,675,000 4,192,000
Jul 2009 3,854,000 4,297,000
Aug 2009 3,744,000 4,060,000
Sep 2009 3,859,000 4,084,000
Oct 2009 3,767,000 3,951,000
Nov 2009 3,992,000 3,873,000
Dec 2009 3,806,000 3,989,000
Jan 2010 3,880,000 3,894,000
Feb 2010 3,781,000 3,830,000
Mar 2010 4,182,000 3,949,000
Apr 2010 4,082,000 3,892,000
May 2010 4,376,000 3,831,000
Jun 2010 4,064,000 4,223,000
Jul 2010 4,116,000 4,278,000
Aug 2010 3,910,000 4,009,000
Sep 2010 3,978,000 4,026,000
Oct 2010 4,061,000 3,784,000
Nov 2010 4,101,000 3,843,000
Dec 2010 4,155,000 4,026,000
Jan 2011 3,910,000 3,908,000
Feb 2011 4,061,000 3,838,000
Mar 2011 4,291,000 3,980,000
Apr 2011 4,218,000 3,924,000
May 2011 4,116,000 4,035,000
Jun 2011 4,297,000 4,094,000
Jul 2011 4,139,000 4,082,000
Aug 2011 4,168,000 4,120,000
Sep 2011 4,320,000 4,115,000
Oct 2011 4,239,000 4,011,000
Nov 2011 4,244,000 4,001,000
Dec 2011 4,234,000 3,994,000
Jan 2012 4,292,000 4,010,000
Feb 2012 4,419,000 4,175,000
Mar 2012 4,465,000 4,134,000
Apr 2012 4,299,000 4,260,000
May 2012 4,445,000 4,336,000
Jun 2012 4,432,000 4,367,000
Jul 2012 4,269,000 4,138,000
Aug 2012 4,447,000 4,360,000
Sep 2012 4,238,000 4,059,000
Oct 2012 4,299,000 4,194,000
Nov 2012 4,393,000 4,171,000
Dec 2012 4,360,000 4,038,000
Jan 2013 4,422,000 4,297,000
Feb 2013 4,509,000 4,156,000
Mar 2013 4,293,000 4,113,000
Apr 2013 4,533,000 4,376,000
May 2013 4,572,000 4,363,000
Jun 2013 4,409,000 4,267,000
Jul 2013 4,529,000 4,384,000
Aug 2013 4,732,000 4,517,000
Sep 2013 4,681,000 4,537,000
Oct 2013 4,444,000 4,288,000
Nov 2013 4,588,000 4,268,000
Dec 2013 4,500,000 4,335,000
Jan 2014 4,615,000 4,443,000
Feb 2014 4,627,000 4,436,000
Mar 2014 4,758,000 4,452,000
Apr 2014 4,812,000 4,518,000
May 2014 4,796,000 4,565,000
Jun 2014 4,817,000 4,552,000
Jul 2014 5,001,000 4,784,000
Aug 2014 4,839,000 4,627,000
Sep 2014 5,078,000 4,882,000
Oct 2014 5,118,000 4,927,000
Nov 2014 5,027,000 4,633,000
Dec 2014 5,165,000 4,789,000
Jan 2015 5,027,000 4,843,000
Feb 2015 4,991,000 4,705,000
Mar 2015 5,090,000 4,986,000
Apr 2015 5,095,000 4,906,000
May 2015 5,143,000 4,812,000
Jun 2015 5,162,000 5,011,000
Jul 2015 5,136,000 4,849,000
Aug 2015 5,129,000 4,958,000
Sep 2015 5,150,000 5,067,000
Oct 2015 5,304,000 4,983,000
Nov 2015 5,323,000 5,003,000
Dec 2015 5,504,000 5,223,000
Jan 2016 5,117,000 5,033,000
Feb 2016 5,447,000 5,183,000
Mar 2016 5,297,000 5,040,000
Apr 2016 5,038,000 4,962,000
May 2016 5,153,000 5,101,000
Jun 2016 5,176,000 4,940,000
Jul 2016 5,328,000 5,001,000
Aug 2016 5,288,000 5,059,000
Sep 2016 5,179,000 4,942,000
Oct 2016 5,200,000 5,041,000
Nov 2016 5,263,000 5,075,000
Dec 2016 5,303,000 5,084,000
Jan 2017 5,424,000 5,247,000
Feb 2017 5,314,000 5,071,000

Hires rates and job openings rates in selected industries, February 2007 to February 2017, seasonally adjusted
Month Construction hires rate Construction job openings rate Retail trade hires rate Retail trade job openings rate Accommodation and food services hires rate Accommodation and food services job openings rate
Feb 2007 4.2 3.5 5.1 2.8 7.2 4.1
Mar 2007 6.1 2.6 5.0 2.7 6.9 4.4
Apr 2007 5.0 2.8 4.7 2.6 7.3 4.0
May 2007 5.3 2.7 4.9 2.3 6.9 4.4
Jun 2007 5.6 2.2 4.6 2.8 7.0 4.4
Jul 2007 5.2 2.6 4.6 2.8 6.9 4.5
Aug 2007 5.3 2.1 4.7 2.5 6.8 4.8
Sep 2007 5.1 1.6 4.9 2.6 6.7 4.7
Oct 2007 5.3 1.6 5.0 2.3 6.9 4.6
Nov 2007 5.0 1.1 5.2 2.7 6.6 4.4
Dec 2007 5.0 1.3 4.8 2.5 6.7 4.5
Jan 2008 5.0 1.7 4.5 2.4 6.3 4.3
Feb 2008 5.1 1.5 4.6 2.3 7.0 4.0
Mar 2008 5.4 1.3 4.4 2.4 6.2 4.0
Apr 2008 5.2 1.6 4.4 2.5 6.3 4.0
May 2008 4.8 2.3 3.9 2.4 6.4 3.9
Jun 2008 5.3 1.6 4.5 1.9 6.1 3.7
Jul 2008 4.9 1.7 4.4 2.4 6.0 3.4
Aug 2008 5.6 1.2 4.4 2.3 5.9 2.8
Sep 2008 4.7 1.7 4.1 1.7 5.9 3.1
Oct 2008 5.4 1.0 4.2 2.4 5.8 2.9
Nov 2008 4.9 0.7 3.8 2.3 5.3 2.5
Dec 2008 5.1 0.7 4.2 1.9 5.2 2.4
Jan 2009 5.4 0.6 3.7 2.2 5.2 1.8
Feb 2009 5.1 1.0 3.6 2.0 5.4 2.5
Mar 2009 4.9 0.7 3.6 1.7 5.0 2.2
Apr 2009 5.3 0.4 3.9 1.4 4.9 2.2
May 2009 5.4 0.7 3.8 2.1 5.3 2.1
Jun 2009 4.3 0.9 3.4 1.8 4.9 2.1
Jul 2009 5.5 1.0 3.4 1.1 4.7 1.8
Aug 2009 4.3 1.0 3.7 1.6 4.8 1.6
Sep 2009 5.5 1.1 3.8 1.9 4.6 2.3
Oct 2009 5.4 1.0 3.4 1.3 4.5 2.0
Nov 2009 5.5 0.8 3.6 1.6 5.0 2.1
Dec 2009 6.0 1.0 3.7 1.7 4.8 2.1
Jan 2010 5.6 0.9 3.8 1.6 4.9 2.2
Feb 2010 5.0 1.1 3.8 1.9 4.7 2.0
Mar 2010 7.4 1.4 4.5 2.3 5.0 1.7
Apr 2010 6.6 1.8 3.7 1.8 4.9 2.1
May 2010 5.5 1.5 3.7 1.8 4.8 2.1
Jun 2010 5.0 1.5 3.9 1.8 4.7 2.0
Jul 2010 6.2 2.1 4.0 1.7 4.9 2.3
Aug 2010 5.9 0.9 3.7 1.6 4.8 2.7
Sep 2010 5.8 1.3 3.9 1.5 5.0 2.1
Oct 2010 6.4 1.2 3.9 1.7 4.9 2.4
Nov 2010 6.2 1.2 3.9 1.8 4.8 2.3
Dec 2010 6.8 0.6 3.4 2.0 4.7 2.3
Jan 2011 5.1 1.1 3.9 1.9 4.7 2.5
Feb 2011 6.3 0.8 3.9 1.8 4.8 3.0
Mar 2011 6.9 1.2 4.0 1.8 5.5 2.8
Apr 2011 6.7 2.2 4.0 2.2 5.1 2.4
May 2011 6.8 2.1 3.9 2.1 4.7 2.5
Jun 2011 6.8 1.2 4.0 2.3 5.3 2.6
Jul 2011 6.2 1.6 4.0 2.3 5.3 2.1
Aug 2011 5.9 1.7 3.6 2.2 5.2 2.8
Sep 2011 6.7 1.5 3.9 2.2 5.3 3.0
Oct 2011 5.9 1.3 3.8 2.3 5.2 3.0
Nov 2011 5.6 1.1 3.8 2.1 5.4 3.0
Dec 2011 5.6 0.8 3.4 2.2 5.3 3.2
Jan 2012 5.8 1.4 3.9 2.4 5.4 3.2
Feb 2012 6.0 1.0 3.8 2.3 5.1 2.9
Mar 2012 5.4 1.6 3.9 2.5 5.8 3.1
Apr 2012 5.2 2.1 3.9 2.2 5.2 3.2
May 2012 5.8 1.5 3.9 2.3 5.3 3.2
Jun 2012 6.3 1.7 3.9 2.2 5.2 3.4
Jul 2012 6.4 1.4 3.8 2.1 5.3 3.3
Aug 2012 6.0 2.0 4.1 2.4 5.5 3.0
Sep 2012 6.2 1.4 4.0 2.4 5.3 2.7
Oct 2012 5.6 1.8 4.0 2.5 5.4 3.2
Nov 2012 6.9 1.2 3.9 3.0 5.2 3.5
Dec 2012 5.4 1.1 3.9 2.6 5.4 3.5
Jan 2013 5.8 2.0 4.0 2.7 5.6 3.4
Feb 2013 6.5 1.9 4.2 2.6 5.5 3.5
Mar 2013 6.1 1.8 3.7 2.7 5.5 3.5
Apr 2013 5.1 2.3 4.1 2.9 6.1 3.3
May 2013 5.7 2.1 4.2 3.1 5.4 3.3
Jun 2013 5.6 2.3 4.1 3.8 5.4 3.5
Jul 2013 5.3 2.0 4.1 3.0 5.4 3.7
Aug 2013 5.1 2.1 4.6 2.9 5.3 3.6
Sep 2013 5.4 1.9 4.4 3.1 5.5 3.8
Oct 2013 5.5 2.1 4.5 2.8 5.5 3.5
Nov 2013 5.1 1.7 4.7 2.8 5.3 3.7
Dec 2013 4.7 1.4 4.8 2.7 5.3 4.0
Jan 2014 4.8 2.1 4.1 2.7 5.6 3.9
Feb 2014 4.4 1.7 4.7 2.9 5.8 4.0
Mar 2014 4.4 2.0 4.6 3.2 5.6 4.2
Apr 2014 5.0 2.1 4.9 3.4 5.6 4.4
May 2014 5.3 2.4 5.0 2.8 5.8 4.9
Jun 2014 4.5 2.7 4.9 3.0 5.9 4.8
Jul 2014 6.4 2.5 5.0 2.8 5.7 4.0
Aug 2014 5.3 2.3 4.6 3.3 5.5 4.7
Sep 2014 4.8 1.7 4.6 3.0 5.9 4.6
Oct 2014 5.1 2.3 5.0 3.1 6.0 4.9
Nov 2014 5.1 1.7 5.0 3.2 6.1 4.3
Dec 2014 6.3 1.5 5.0 3.4 6.3 4.6
Jan 2015 5.7 2.2 4.9 3.2 5.8 5.2
Feb 2015 5.1 2.4 4.5 3.3 5.8 4.9
Mar 2015 4.9 2.6 4.9 3.2 6.0 4.7
Apr 2015 5.3 2.6 4.7 3.4 6.2 5.0
May 2015 4.9 2.6 5.0 3.5 6.1 4.8
Jun 2015 5.2 2.3 4.9 3.4 6.2 4.4
Jul 2015 4.7 2.3 4.9 3.8 6.3 5.2
Aug 2015 5.0 2.4 4.7 3.7 6.5 4.8
Sep 2015 5.3 1.6 4.6 4.0 6.5 4.7
Oct 2015 5.0 2.0 4.7 3.5 6.5 5.0
Nov 2015 5.2 1.3 4.9 3.2 6.6 4.8
Dec 2015 4.7 1.9 4.9 3.2 6.9 4.8
Jan 2016 4.4 2.3 4.8 3.9 5.9 4.8
Feb 2016 5.2 2.8 5.3 3.7 6.8 5.1
Mar 2016 5.3 3.0 4.7 3.7 6.4 5.1
Apr 2016 5.0 2.7 4.3 3.6 6.1 4.9
May 2016 4.7 2.7 4.4 3.6 6.3 4.8
Jun 2016 4.2 2.5 4.5 3.7 6.2 4.6
Jul 2016 5.0 3.4 4.5 3.8 6.3 4.6
Aug 2016 5.1 2.7 4.6 3.7 6.3 4.8
Sep 2016 4.7 3.4 4.8 3.8 6.0 4.6
Oct 2016 5.1 2.8 4.7 3.9 6.1 4.5
Nov 2016 5.0 2.6 4.2 3.9 6.7 4.7
Dec 2016 5.9 2.0 4.2 3.9 6.4 4.5
Jan 2017 5.7 2.0 4.3 3.5 6.4 4.6
Feb 2017 5.4 2.4 4.8 3.3 6.2 5.0

Hires rates and job openings rates in selected industries, February 2007 to February 2017, seasonally adjusted
Month Financial activities hires rate Financial activities job openings rate Professional and business services hires rate Professional and business services job openings rate Health care and social assistance hires rate Health care and social assistance job openings rate
Feb 2007 3.0 3.0 5.5 3.9 2.9 4.0
Mar 2007 3.4 3.9 5.5 4.3 3.0 4.2
Apr 2007 2.7 2.8 5.0 4.6 2.9 4.3
May 2007 3.4 3.3 5.4 4.1 3.1 4.4
Jun 2007 3.0 3.2 4.9 4.1 3.0 4.5
Jul 2007 2.9 3.4 5.1 3.7 2.8 3.9
Aug 2007 3.1 3.6 5.1 4.0 3.0 4.3
Sep 2007 3.0 3.3 5.1 4.0 2.9 4.8
Oct 2007 3.0 3.3 5.4 4.1 3.0 4.1
Nov 2007 2.8 2.8 5.4 4.0 3.0 4.2
Dec 2007 2.9 3.2 5.1 4.1 2.7 4.2
Jan 2008 2.9 3.8 4.8 4.0 3.0 4.0
Feb 2008 2.9 2.7 4.7 4.0 3.2 4.5
Mar 2008 2.6 3.0 4.5 4.1 3.1 4.3
Apr 2008 2.8 2.7 5.1 4.1 3.1 4.1
May 2008 2.4 2.4 4.5 3.4 2.9 4.1
Jun 2008 2.7 2.3 5.3 4.0 2.7 4.0
Jul 2008 2.5 2.6 4.4 3.6 2.8 3.9
Aug 2008 2.6 2.6 4.5 3.5 2.8 3.7
Sep 2008 2.6 2.3 4.3 3.4 2.7 3.4
Oct 2008 2.2 2.0 4.5 3.2 2.9 3.4
Nov 2008 2.5 2.4 4.2 3.0 2.6 3.3
Dec 2008 2.0 2.4 4.8 3.2 2.7 3.3
Jan 2009 2.4 2.3 4.4 3.1 2.8 3.1
Feb 2009 2.2 2.5 4.3 3.1 2.8 3.0
Mar 2009 2.3 2.3 3.6 2.5 2.6 2.8
Apr 2009 1.7 1.6 4.0 2.4 2.5 2.8
May 2009 2.0 2.2 4.0 2.4 2.4 2.9
Jun 2009 2.0 1.9 3.9 2.4 2.6 2.8
Jul 2009 2.4 1.7 4.2 2.6 2.6 2.9
Aug 2009 2.2 1.6 3.8 2.1 2.8 2.8
Sep 2009 1.9 2.2 4.2 2.6 2.8 3.1
Oct 2009 2.3 2.0 4.2 2.2 2.5 2.9
Nov 2009 1.8 2.1 5.1 2.5 2.6 2.8
Dec 2009 2.3 1.7 4.1 2.6 2.5 2.9
Jan 2010 2.2 2.1 4.5 2.4 2.3 3.2
Feb 2010 2.1 1.9 4.4 2.3 2.4 2.8
Mar 2010 1.9 2.0 4.4 2.5 2.5 2.6
Apr 2010 2.3 2.8 4.7 3.0 2.5 2.7
May 2010 2.3 2.7 4.7 3.4 2.4 2.6
Jun 2010 2.4 2.6 5.0 2.8 2.6 2.5
Jul 2010 2.1 2.8 4.8 3.2 2.7 2.7
Aug 2010 2.0 3.1 4.7 3.5 2.4 2.4
Sep 2010 2.2 2.9 4.5 3.3 2.6 2.7
Oct 2010 2.2 3.1 4.5 3.5 2.4 3.1
Nov 2010 2.0 3.2 4.7 3.7 2.5 2.8
Dec 2010 2.4 2.5 5.4 3.4 2.5 2.8
Jan 2011 2.0 2.7 4.8 2.7 2.1 2.6
Feb 2011 1.9 2.7 5.0 3.4 2.3 2.8
Mar 2011 2.1 2.5 5.3 3.4 2.3 3.0
Apr 2011 1.7 3.1 5.1 3.2 2.4 3.0
May 2011 2.0 2.5 5.1 3.3 2.4 3.0
Jun 2011 2.1 2.7 4.8 3.5 2.6 3.1
Jul 2011 2.1 2.9 4.8 4.3 2.4 3.1
Aug 2011 2.0 2.3 5.1 3.3 2.5 3.1
Sep 2011 2.0 2.2 5.2 4.1 2.3 3.0
Oct 2011 2.2 2.9 5.0 3.4 2.4 3.2
Nov 2011 2.2 2.0 4.9 3.0 2.5 3.3
Dec 2011 2.2 2.4 4.9 4.2 2.4 3.2
Jan 2012 2.1 3.0 4.6 4.4 2.6 3.4
Feb 2012 2.2 2.5 5.4 3.5 2.8 3.5
Mar 2012 2.3 2.9 5.2 4.4 2.6 3.5
Apr 2012 2.4 2.7 4.8 3.3 2.4 3.5
May 2012 2.3 3.0 5.2 3.7 2.7 3.5
Jun 2012 2.3 2.8 5.4 3.9 2.6 3.9
Jul 2012 2.2 3.1 4.8 3.7 2.5 3.3
Aug 2012 2.5 3.2 4.8 4.0 2.5 3.3
Sep 2012 2.6 3.5 4.7 3.3 2.4 3.6
Oct 2012 2.4 3.3 4.7 3.5 2.5 3.5
Nov 2012 2.8 2.9 4.9 3.2 2.5 3.5
Dec 2012 2.2 3.2 4.7 3.3 2.6 3.5
Jan 2013 2.7 2.9 4.9 3.7 2.6 3.0
Feb 2013 2.9 4.4 4.6 4.0 2.6 3.5
Mar 2013 2.3 3.4 4.6 3.7 2.6 3.5
Apr 2013 2.4 3.5 4.9 3.6 2.8 3.6
May 2013 2.7 3.8 4.9 3.3 2.7 3.4
Jun 2013 2.4 3.8 5.2 3.3 2.4 3.4
Jul 2013 2.7 3.9 5.3 3.1 2.6 3.3
Aug 2013 2.7 3.3 5.5 3.6 2.7 3.6
Sep 2013 2.8 3.0 5.2 3.6 2.7 3.2
Oct 2013 2.4 3.0 4.6 4.1 2.5 3.2
Nov 2013 2.3 2.7 5.2 3.6 2.5 3.2
Dec 2013 2.2 2.9 4.9 3.7 2.5 2.9
Jan 2014 2.0 2.8 5.2 3.4 2.7 3.4
Feb 2014 2.2 2.9 5.2 4.1 2.5 3.5
Mar 2014 2.5 3.0 5.3 3.6 2.7 3.6
Apr 2014 2.3 3.2 5.1 4.2 2.8 3.5
May 2014 2.4 3.5 4.9 4.1 2.6 3.9
Jun 2014 2.3 3.8 5.1 4.2 2.6 3.8
Jul 2014 2.4 3.6 5.3 4.3 2.8 4.1
Aug 2014 2.7 3.9 5.5 4.7 2.5 4.5
Sep 2014 2.6 3.1 5.8 4.3 2.9 4.1
Oct 2014 2.2 3.9 5.6 4.7 2.9 4.4
Nov 2014 2.8 3.3 5.1 5.1 2.8 3.8
Dec 2014 2.8 3.2 5.1 5.0 2.9 4.4
Jan 2015 2.5 3.6 5.2 4.6 2.8 4.3
Feb 2015 2.0 4.1 5.3 4.6 2.9 4.4
Mar 2015 2.4 3.2 5.4 5.0 2.8 4.1
Apr 2015 2.6 4.5 5.3 5.5 2.9 4.9
May 2015 2.4 3.7 5.4 5.4 2.8 4.5
Jun 2015 2.5 3.3 5.3 5.6 2.7 4.6
Jul 2015 2.3 4.5 5.1 5.5 2.9 5.2
Aug 2015 2.2 4.0 5.1 5.2 2.8 4.9
Sep 2015 2.4 3.6 5.2 5.5 2.9 5.0
Oct 2015 2.5 3.8 5.5 5.4 3.0 4.8
Nov 2015 2.6 4.1 5.4 5.6 3.0 5.0
Dec 2015 2.6 4.5 5.9 5.3 3.0 4.9
Jan 2016 2.6 4.0 5.6 5.4 2.7 5.3
Feb 2016 2.9 4.0 5.4 5.3 2.9 4.7
Mar 2016 2.7 3.7 5.4 6.1 2.9 4.8
Apr 2016 2.3 3.9 5.5 4.7 2.6 4.8
May 2016 2.2 3.4 5.5 5.7 2.8 4.8
Jun 2016 2.4 3.5 5.0 4.9 2.9 5.0
Jul 2016 2.2 3.7 6.0 5.9 2.9 4.9
Aug 2016 2.3 3.8 5.5 4.9 2.9 4.8
Sep 2016 2.1 3.9 5.5 5.3 2.7 4.9
Oct 2016 2.0 3.7 5.4 5.1 2.9 5.2
Nov 2016 2.1 3.7 5.3 4.9 3.0 5.2
Dec 2016 2.3 4.1 5.6 4.6 2.9 5.2
Jan 2017 2.6 4.4 5.5 4.9 2.9 5.2
Feb 2017 2.2 4.2 5.2 4.7 2.8 5.6