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Topic Archives: Geographic Information

Celebrating World Statistics Day 2020

At the Bureau of Labor Statistics, we always enjoy a good celebration. We just finished recognizing Hispanic Heritage Month. We are currently learning how best to protect our online lives during National Cybersecurity Awareness Month. We even track the number of paid holidays available to workers through the National Compensation Survey. Today I want to focus on a celebration that happens once every 5 years — World Statistics Day. While there may not be parades, special meals, or department store sales to honor this day, we at BLS and our colleagues worldwide take time out on October 20, 2020, to recognize the importance of providing accurate, timely, and objective statistics that form the cornerstone of good decisions.

United Nations logo for World Statistics Day 2020

World Statistics Day, organized under the guidance of the United Nations Statistical Commission, was first celebrated in October 2010. This year, the third such event, focuses on “connecting the world with data we can trust.” At BLS, the trustworthy nature of our data and processes has been a hallmark of our work since our founding in 1884. Our first Commissioner, Carroll Wright, described our work then as “conducting judicious investigations and the fearless publication of results.” That credo guides us to this day. As the only noncareer employee in the agency, I am surrounded by a dedicated staff of data experts  whose singular mission is to produce the highest-quality data, without regard to policy or politics. BLS and other statistical agencies throughout the federal government strictly follow Statistical Policy Directives that ensure we produce data that meet precise technical standards and make them available equally to all. For nearly 100 years, we have regularly updated our Handbook of Methods to provide details on data concepts, collection and processing methods, and limitations. Transparency remains a hallmark of our work.

The United States has a decentralized statistical system, with numerous agencies large and small spread throughout the federal government. Despite this decentralization, the agencies work together to improve statistical methods and follow centralized statistical guidance. This partnership was recently strengthened by the Foundations for Evidence-Based Policymaking Act of 2018, which reinforced how the statistical agencies protect the confidentiality of businesses and households that provide data. The Act also designated heads of statistical agencies, like myself, as Statistical Officials for their respective Departments. In my case, my BLS colleagues and I advise other Department of Labor agencies on statistical concepts and processes, while continuing to stay clear of policy discussions and decisions.

World Statistics Day is a global event, so this is a good time to share some examples where BLS participates in statistical activities around the world:

  • We have regular contact with colleagues at statistical organizations around the world. Just recently, I participated in a very long-distance video conference on improvements to the Consumer Price Index. For me, it was 6:00 a.m., and I made sure I had a mug of coffee handy; for my colleagues in Australia, it was 6:00 p.m., and I’m certain their mug had coffee as well.
  • We have a well-established training program for international visitors, focusing on our processes and methods. We hold training sessions at BLS headquarters (or at least we did before the pandemic), we send experts to other countries, and we are exploring virtual training. We are eager to share our expertise and long history.
  • We participate in international panels and study groups, such as those organized by the United Nations, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and others, with topics ranging from measuring the gig economy to use of social media.
  • We provide BLS data to international databases, highlighting employment, price, productivity and related information to compare with other countries.

And that’s just a taste of how BLS fits into the World of Statistics. As Commissioner, I’ve had the honor to represent the United States in conferences and meetings across the globe. The BLS staff and I also hold regular conversations with statistical officials worldwide. In a recent conversation with colleagues in the United Kingdom, we were eager to learn about each other’s changes in the ways we provide data and analyses to our customers. These interactions expand everyone’s knowledge and keep the worldwide statistical system moving forward.

To celebrate World Statistics Day, I asked some BLS cheerleaders if they would join me in a video message about the importance of quality statistical data. Here’s what they had to say:

In closing, let’s all raise a toast to World Statistics Day, the availability of high-quality and impartial data, and the dedicated staff worldwide who provide new information and analysis every day.

Happy World Statistics Day!

A Closer Look at Recent Employment Trends

BLS has closely tracked the upheaval in the U.S. job market in recent months, most notably through the monthly “payroll jobs” data. These data, from the Current Employment Statistics survey, provide detail on the change in employment in each industry. We count jobs by asking thousands of employers every month the number of employees on their payroll for the pay period that includes the 12th of the month. For August, we reported that employers added 1.4 million jobs. Today I want to scratch beneath that surface and examine recent employment trends in several industries.

But before I go on, let me take a moment to thank all those businesses that respond voluntarily to our request for information every month. With so much going on, responding to a BLS survey may not be your highest priority. Yet, you continue to come through every month, and for that we extend our sincere thanks.

Using February 2020 as our starting point, let’s look at the job losses that occurred through April. From the nearly 152 million jobs recorded in February, we lost just over 22 million by the end of April. That’s a drop of 14.5 percent in total nonfarm employment. But that decline varied across industries. The leisure and hospitality industry, including restaurants, hotels, and amusements, saw the largest percentage decline, down 49.3 percent from February. Other industries saw percentage declines similar to the overall total, such as retail trade (decline of 15.2 percent) and construction (decline of 14.2 percent). And some industries experienced small declines, such as financial activities (decline of 3.2 percent). These differences stem from many factors, including stay-at-home orders, the need for workers in essential industries, the ability for some work to be done remotely, and on and on.

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

Following large losses through April, many industries gained jobs over the next four months. By August, about 10.6 million jobs were added to employer payrolls. One way to look at these figures is to consider what share of the March/April job loss was “recovered” by the May/June/July/August job gain. Overall, 47.9 percent of the decline was recovered. The retail trade industry restored the greatest percentage of job losses, 72.5 percent, followed by other services (including barbers and salons, 61.2 percent) and construction (60.8 percent). Education and health services recovered 47.6 percent of lost jobs, nearly equal to the overall percentage of jobs recovered, as did manufacturing (47.2 percent). Utilities, mining and logging, and the information industry had fewer jobs in August than in April.

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

While the percentages let you compare industries, digging a little deeper uncovers other interesting stories. For example, three sectors, professional and business services; manufacturing; and transportation and warehousing, each lost between 10 and 11 percent of jobs from February to April 2020. But those losses amounted to vastly different numbers of jobs: 2.3 million in professional and business services; 1.4 million in manufacturing; and 570,000 in transportation and warehousing.

Some detailed industries provide interesting contrasts. Within health care from February to April, hospital employment showed a slight decline while offices of physicians lost about 11 percent of jobs. In contrast, offices of dentists declined by 56 percent, losing more than half a million jobs. As of August, employment had rebounded in most health care industries, with the notable exception of nursing and residential care facilities, which has declined each month since February.

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

Americans were encouraged to stay at home and only venture out for essential items, which is reflected in employment in various retail industries. For example, food and beverage stores showed little employment change from February to August. In contrast, clothing store employment declined by 62 percent through April, and only half of that loss had been recovered by August. Jobs in electronics and appliance stores declined through May and in August stood at about 90 percent of their February total.

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

A reminder that Current Employment Statistics data are updated as new information becomes available. Thus, the July and August data shown here are preliminary and will be revised. Employment data by industry are also available for states and localities.

When looking for trends or comparing industries of different sizes, the comparisons shown here can be helpful. The detailed data are available for you to compare other industries, too. Get the data through the BLS data query system.

Percent decline in payroll employment from February through April 2020, by major industry
IndustryPercent decline

Leisure and hospitality

-49.3

Other services

-23.1

Retail trade

-15.2

Total nonfarm

-14.5

Construction

-14.2

Education and health services

-11.3

Professional and business services

-10.7

Manufacturing

-10.6

Transportation and warehousing

-10.0

Information

-9.8

Mining and logging

-8.5

Wholesale trade

-6.7

Government

-4.3

Financial activities

-3.2

Utilities

-0.7
Percent of payroll employment decline from February to April 2020 that was recovered by August 2020, by major industry
IndustryPercent recovered

Retail trade

72.5

Other services

61.2

Construction

60.8

Leisure and hospitality

50.2

Total nonfarm

47.9

Education and health services

47.6

Manufacturing

47.2

Professional and business services

35.8

Transportation and warehousing

33.2

Financial activities

31.5

Wholesale trade

17.4

Government

14.2

Information

-9.5

Mining and logging

-59.0

Utilities

-86.8
Percent of February 2020 employment level in months after February, selected health care industries
IndustryAprilMayJuneJulyAugust

Offices of physicians

89.291.594.195.296.2

Offices of dentists

43.869.289.093.996.1

Hospitals

97.797.097.197.697.8

Nursing and residential care facilities

96.494.994.393.793.2
Percent of February 2020 employment level in months after February, selected retail industries
IndustryAprilMayJuneJulyAugust

Electronics and appliance stores

89.874.780.286.290.5

Building material and garden supply stores

97.3101.8104.3105.1106.1

Food and beverage stores

98.6100.4101.7101.0101.2

Clothing and clothing accessories stores

38.244.562.470.371.1

Department stores

75.279.490.094.597.5

General merchandise stores, including warehouse stores

104.6106.2109.0105.8110.1

New Measures of How Widespread Employment Changes Are across States and Metro Areas

BLS recently began publishing a new set of measures on employment changes in states and metropolitan areas. For decades we have published monthly estimates of employment, hours, and earnings for each state and metro area. Our new measure summarizes how widespread employment increases or decreases are across all states or metro areas. We call this measure a diffusion index.

What’s a diffusion index? Let me explain how we create the measure.

Let’s say we’re creating a diffusion index for the 50 states and the District of Columbia. We start by assigning each state and D.C. a value depending on whether its employment decreased, stayed the same, or increased over the period we’re looking at.

  • The assigned value is 0 if employment decreased.
  • The assigned value is 50 if employment stayed the same.
  • The assigned value is 100 if employment increased.

The diffusion index is the average of those 51 values. To create a diffusion index for metro areas, we assign values of 0, 50, or 100 for each of 388 metro areas and then average those values. We calculate diffusion indexes for employment changes over 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months.

Now that we understand the simple arithmetic for calculating diffusion indexes, what do they mean? An index greater than 50 means more states or metro areas had increasing employment over the period. An index below 50 means more states or metro areas had decreasing employment. At the extremes, an index of 0 means employment fell in all states or metro areas; an index of 100 means employment rose in all of them. A diffusion index of 50 doesn’t necessarily mean 50 percent of the states or areas had increasing employment and the other 50 percent had decreasing employment. It just means the same number of states or areas had increases and decreases, with any of the other states or areas having no change.

The chart below shows 3-month diffusion indexes for all states and metro areas. You can see how all states and nearly all metro areas had job losses during the worst of the 2007–09 recession. We see it again more recently with the downturn associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.

3-month diffusion indexes for all states and all metropolitan areas, 2007–20

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

Diffusion indexes aren’t a new analytical tool. We publish other diffusion indexes using national employment data that summarize how employment change is dispersed across industries. The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia publishes diffusion indexes using a variety of data. The new BLS diffusion indexes summarize how employment is changing across geographic areas to give us another perspective of the labor market.

Keep a look out for the new data. We update the indexes each month in our public database.

3-month diffusion indexes for all states and all metropolitan areas
MonthAll statesAll metropolitan areas

Jan 2007

96.177.7

Feb 2007

84.372.2

Mar 2007

84.372.6

Apr 2007

74.559.1

May 2007

86.365.3

Jun 2007

69.661.2

Jul 2007

78.467.7

Aug 2007

74.561.2

Sep 2007

56.951.3

Oct 2007

62.753.2

Nov 2007

79.459.1

Dec 2007

80.463.0

Jan 2008

81.465.3

Feb 2008

78.464.0

Mar 2008

52.050.6

Apr 2008

41.236.2

May 2008

25.529.8

Jun 2008

23.535.4

Jul 2008

16.733.9

Aug 2008

16.729.8

Sep 2008

15.723.6

Oct 2008

7.817.8

Nov 2008

7.811.9

Dec 2008

3.910.1

Jan 2009

2.04.3

Feb 2009

2.03.9

Mar 2009

0.04.1

Apr 2009

0.03.6

May 2009

2.04.9

Jun 2009

3.911.7

Jul 2009

8.814.6

Aug 2009

4.914.0

Sep 2009

5.920.0

Oct 2009

16.728.0

Nov 2009

21.638.5

Dec 2009

19.638.1

Jan 2010

26.538.8

Feb 2010

18.636.0

Mar 2010

70.656.3

Apr 2010

94.174.6

May 2010

100.086.6

Jun 2010

98.079.0

Jul 2010

85.364.3

Aug 2010

35.342.4

Sep 2010

39.244.7

Oct 2010

70.663.7

Nov 2010

74.564.8

Dec 2010

88.273.7

Jan 2011

62.757.0

Feb 2011

76.561.9

Mar 2011

87.367.9

Apr 2011

98.075.5

May 2011

90.267.0

Jun 2011

80.456.4

Jul 2011

83.366.8

Aug 2011

82.472.3

Sep 2011

98.081.8

Oct 2011

82.464.8

Nov 2011

96.166.8

Dec 2011

82.463.1

Jan 2012

88.276.7

Feb 2012

97.178.9

Mar 2012

98.083.1

Apr 2012

96.175.9

May 2012

94.170.0

Jun 2012

70.658.1

Jul 2012

74.557.0

Aug 2012

77.564.4

Sep 2012

86.367.5

Oct 2012

97.176.7

Nov 2012

93.175.4

Dec 2012

90.273.7

Jan 2013

88.270.2

Feb 2013

94.179.5

Mar 2013

99.075.9

Apr 2013

87.375.0

May 2013

82.468.7

Jun 2013

82.468.4

Jul 2013

81.470.6

Aug 2013

94.176.4

Sep 2013

92.277.8

Oct 2013

90.277.8

Nov 2013

94.174.7

Dec 2013

81.473.2

Jan 2014

88.268.7

Feb 2014

80.466.5

Mar 2014

86.373.6

Apr 2014

96.182.0

May 2014

98.083.4

Jun 2014

96.183.5

Jul 2014

96.174.2

Aug 2014

92.274.5

Sep 2014

90.277.2

Oct 2014

98.079.9

Nov 2014

96.179.8

Dec 2014

98.081.8

Jan 2015

93.180.0

Feb 2015

84.374.5

Mar 2015

64.762.5

Apr 2015

74.565.1

May 2015

84.377.1

Jun 2015

84.378.2

Jul 2015

92.284.1

Aug 2015

80.474.5

Sep 2015

86.374.1

Oct 2015

88.275.9

Nov 2015

88.274.6

Dec 2015

88.273.2

Jan 2016

75.571.1

Feb 2016

81.472.4

Mar 2016

78.469.5

Apr 2016

86.377.1

May 2016

72.567.3

Jun 2016

55.957.7

Jul 2016

84.371.3

Aug 2016

86.376.2

Sep 2016

94.185.1

Oct 2016

68.666.9

Nov 2016

82.473.6

Dec 2016

78.464.7

Jan 2017

84.370.0

Feb 2017

79.468.9

Mar 2017

98.076.5

Apr 2017

88.272.0

May 2017

78.468.4

Jun 2017

91.269.6

Jul 2017

80.471.6

Aug 2017

91.275.6

Sep 2017

76.560.8

Oct 2017

80.473.8

Nov 2017

84.370.7

Dec 2017

91.273.8

Jan 2018

90.274.2

Feb 2018

96.180.2

Mar 2018

96.180.9

Apr 2018

86.372.9

May 2018

82.473.6

Jun 2018

94.176.7

Jul 2018

91.281.3

Aug 2018

94.177.2

Sep 2018

82.468.4

Oct 2018

94.172.8

Nov 2018

92.272.3

Dec 2018

88.267.9

Jan 2019

89.279.4

Feb 2019

84.373.3

Mar 2019

82.474.9

Apr 2019

61.856.4

May 2019

64.758.5

Jun 2019

66.755.4

Jul 2019

74.560.8

Aug 2019

80.467.1

Sep 2019

79.466.4

Oct 2019

70.660.3

Nov 2019

68.663.7

Dec 2019

74.567.9

Jan 2020

87.375.9

Feb 2020

86.371.8

Mar 2020

5.929.0

Apr 2020

0.00.0

May 2020

0.00.3

Jun 2020[p]

0.00.6

[p] preliminary

New State and Metropolitan Area Data from the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey

Soon after I became Commissioner, the top-notch BLS staff shared with me their vision to expand the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS). The JOLTS program publishes data each month on the number and rate of job openings, hires, and separations (broken out by quits, layoffs and discharges, and other separations). These data are available at the national level and for the four large geographic regions—Northeast, Midwest, South, and West.

That left a major data gap on labor demand, hires, and separations for states and metropolitan areas. BLS provides data on labor supply for states and metro areas each month from the Local Area Unemployment Statistics program. We also provide data on employment change in states and metro areas each month from the Current Employment Statistics survey. Employment change is the net effect of hires and separations, but it doesn’t show the underlying flow of job creation and destruction. Having better, timelier state and metro JOLTS data would provide a quicker signal about whether labor demand is accelerating or weakening in local economies.

About 2 months after the staff briefed me, the JOLTS program published experimental state estimates for the first time on May 24, 2019. We have been updating those estimates on a quarterly basis since then. We use a statistical model to help us produce the most current state estimates. We then improve those estimates during an annual benchmark process by taking advantage of data available from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. The JOLTS program is well on its way to moving these state estimates into its official, monthly data stream. Look for that to happen in the second half of 2021!

The President’s proposed budget for fiscal year 2021 includes three improvements to the JOLTS program.

  • Expand the sample to support direct sample-based estimates for each state.
  • Accelerate the review and publication of the estimates.
  • Add questions to provide more information about job openings, hires, and separations.

If funded, this proposal would allow BLS to improve the data quality available from the current JOLTS state estimates. It also would let us add very broad industry detail for each state and more industry detail at the national level.

The proposed larger sample size may also let us produce model-assisted JOLTS estimates for many metro areas. To demonstrate this potential, the JOLTS team produced a one-time set of research estimates for the 18 largest metropolitan statistical areas, those with 1.5 million or more employees. These research estimates show the potential for data that would be available regularly with a larger JOLTS sample. I encourage you to explore this exciting new research series and let us know what you think.

Number of unemployed per job opening in the United States and four large metropolitan areas, 2007–19

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

This is just one example of the excellent work I see at BLS every day. The BLS staff are consummate professionals who continue to do outstanding work even in the most trying of times. The entire BLS staff has been teleworking now for several months due to COVID-19, and every program continues to produce high quality data on schedule! Even in these extraordinary circumstances, BLS professionals continue to innovate and find ways to improve quality and develop new gold standard data products to help the policymakers, businesses, and the public make better-informed decisions.

Number of unemployed per job opening in the United States and four large metropolitan areas
DateNew York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PADallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TXChicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WILos Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CAUnited States

Jan 2007

1.81.41.81.61.6

Feb 2007

1.81.41.91.61.6

Mar 2007

1.71.31.81.61.6

Apr 2007

1.61.11.61.51.4

May 2007

1.51.01.51.51.4

Jun 2007

1.51.11.61.41.4

Jul 2007

1.61.21.81.51.5

Aug 2007

1.71.21.91.51.5

Sep 2007

1.71.21.81.71.5

Oct 2007

1.61.11.71.81.5

Nov 2007

1.61.21.81.91.5

Dec 2007

1.71.21.91.91.6

Jan 2008

1.91.32.02.11.7

Feb 2008

2.11.32.22.21.8

Mar 2008

2.21.32.42.21.9

Apr 2008

2.11.22.22.01.8

May 2008

2.01.22.22.11.8

Jun 2008

1.91.22.42.51.9

Jul 2008

2.21.43.03.02.2

Aug 2008

2.31.73.13.52.4

Sep 2008

2.41.83.13.62.5

Oct 2008

2.51.93.04.02.6

Nov 2008

2.82.13.44.62.9

Dec 2008

3.12.43.95.93.3

Jan 2009

3.62.94.86.74.0

Feb 2009

4.43.25.57.34.6

Mar 2009

5.03.56.47.45.1

Apr 2009

5.03.66.77.35.3

May 2009

5.14.06.87.15.4

Jun 2009

5.14.67.26.85.6

Jul 2009

5.25.37.77.46.0

Aug 2009

5.15.67.97.76.2

Sep 2009

5.45.88.08.06.1

Oct 2009

5.95.37.87.85.8

Nov 2009

6.75.68.68.25.9

Dec 2009

7.15.69.58.36.2

Jan 2010

7.06.310.88.36.2

Feb 2010

7.06.410.37.56.2

Mar 2010

7.05.98.87.15.9

Apr 2010

6.55.17.86.75.4

May 2010

5.94.86.66.54.9

Jun 2010

5.05.16.26.74.8

Jul 2010

4.85.26.07.14.9

Aug 2010

4.75.46.27.54.9

Sep 2010

4.94.76.17.54.7

Oct 2010

4.64.25.27.14.5

Nov 2010

4.84.05.07.14.5

Dec 2010

5.34.15.17.14.6

Jan 2011

6.04.35.57.15.0

Feb 2011

6.14.25.76.84.9

Mar 2011

5.54.05.36.34.6

Apr 2011

5.03.85.15.84.2

May 2011

4.63.64.65.84.1

Jun 2011

4.53.74.55.64.0

Jul 2011

4.63.84.65.94.1

Aug 2011

4.53.84.96.04.0

Sep 2011

4.43.44.65.83.8

Oct 2011

4.23.14.25.63.6

Nov 2011

4.03.04.25.33.6

Dec 2011

4.23.04.85.53.7

Jan 2012

4.63.05.25.93.7

Feb 2012

5.33.04.86.23.7

Mar 2012

5.12.84.25.73.5

Apr 2012

4.22.43.65.03.3

May 2012

3.92.13.44.83.1

Jun 2012

3.92.13.64.63.1

Jul 2012

4.22.33.95.33.3

Aug 2012

4.02.43.95.23.4

Sep 2012

3.82.43.55.53.2

Oct 2012

3.72.13.25.03.0

Nov 2012

3.92.03.44.83.0

Dec 2012

4.02.03.75.13.2

Jan 2013

4.22.24.35.43.4

Feb 2013

4.22.14.15.43.4

Mar 2013

4.02.03.94.93.2

Apr 2013

3.51.93.54.12.9

May 2013

3.21.93.53.82.7

Jun 2013

3.22.13.63.62.7

Jul 2013

3.42.33.83.82.9

Aug 2013

3.42.33.73.92.9

Sep 2013

3.42.13.64.02.8

Oct 2013

3.22.03.33.92.5

Nov 2013

3.22.03.24.12.5

Dec 2013

3.22.03.34.22.6

Jan 2014

3.42.03.54.22.7

Feb 2014

3.41.93.53.72.7

Mar 2014

3.21.93.33.32.6

Apr 2014

2.81.72.62.82.2

May 2014

2.51.62.12.82.0

Jun 2014

2.41.62.02.81.9

Jul 2014

2.61.62.13.12.0

Aug 2014

2.61.62.12.91.9

Sep 2014

2.51.62.02.91.9

Oct 2014

2.31.51.92.71.7

Nov 2014

2.41.51.92.91.8

Dec 2014

2.51.31.92.91.8

Jan 2015

2.61.32.02.91.9

Feb 2015

2.51.31.92.61.8

Mar 2015

2.41.31.82.41.7

Apr 2015

2.21.21.62.21.6

May 2015

2.01.11.52.21.5

Jun 2015

1.91.01.62.31.5

Jul 2015

1.91.01.62.31.5

Aug 2015

1.90.91.62.31.5

Sep 2015

1.80.91.52.31.4

Oct 2015

1.70.81.52.01.3

Nov 2015

1.60.81.52.01.3

Dec 2015

1.60.81.51.91.4

Jan 2016

1.70.91.61.91.4

Feb 2016

1.80.81.61.71.5

Mar 2016

1.70.81.61.61.4

Apr 2016

1.60.71.61.61.3

May 2016

1.40.71.41.61.2

Jun 2016

1.40.81.41.61.3

Jul 2016

1.40.91.41.81.3

Aug 2016

1.50.91.51.91.4

Sep 2016

1.40.91.51.91.3

Oct 2016

1.30.91.51.71.3

Nov 2016

1.30.91.41.71.3

Dec 2016

1.30.91.51.71.3

Jan 2017

1.41.01.71.81.4

Feb 2017

1.51.01.71.81.4

Mar 2017

1.51.01.51.81.4

Apr 2017

1.30.91.41.61.2

May 2017

1.30.91.21.51.1

Jun 2017

1.31.01.21.41.1

Jul 2017

1.31.11.21.51.1

Aug 2017

1.41.11.21.61.1

Sep 2017

1.41.01.11.51.1

Oct 2017

1.31.01.01.31.0

Nov 2017

1.21.01.01.31.0

Dec 2017

1.21.01.11.31.0

Jan 2018

1.21.11.31.31.1

Feb 2018

1.21.11.31.21.1

Mar 2018

1.21.11.21.21.1

Apr 2018

1.11.01.11.11.0

May 2018

1.01.00.91.00.9

Jun 2018

1.00.90.81.10.9

Jul 2018

1.00.80.81.10.9

Aug 2018

1.00.80.91.20.9

Sep 2018

0.90.80.91.20.8

Oct 2018

0.90.80.81.10.8

Nov 2018

0.80.80.81.20.8

Dec 2018

0.90.70.81.30.8

Jan 2019

1.00.80.91.40.9

Feb 2019

1.10.81.01.40.9

Mar 2019

1.10.80.91.40.9

Apr 2019

1.00.70.91.10.8

May 2019

0.80.70.81.00.8

Jun 2019

0.80.60.80.90.8

Jul 2019

0.80.70.81.00.8

Aug 2019

0.80.80.91.10.9

Sep 2019

0.80.80.91.20.8

Oct 2019

0.80.80.81.10.8

Nov 2019

0.80.80.71.00.8

Dec 2019

0.80.80.71.00.8

How Many Unemployed People? Comparing Survey Data and Unemployment Insurance Counts

More than 37 million people filed for unemployment insurance benefits in the 10 weeks from the week ending March 21 to the week ending May 23. The unemployment rate in April was 14.7 percent. Or was it 19.5 percent? There were 23 million people counted as unemployed in mid-April, and 18 million people received unemployment insurance (UI) benefits at that time. How can all of these things be true? What’s the real story?

Back in October, I set the record straight on how counts of people receiving unemployment insurance benefits differ from how BLS measures unemployment. These two measures offer distinct but related measures of trends in joblessness, some of which I will explore here. I will focus only on data from states’ regular UI programs, but other programs exist as well. Here’s the bottom line: When all is said and done, the two measures track each other very closely.

The number of people filing for UI benefits reached record levels in recent weeks as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to contain it. The UI claims numbers don’t come from BLS but rather from our colleagues at the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration. Their count of people receiving UI benefits hit its highest level ever, nearly 23 million (not seasonally adjusted), for the week ending May 9. Their separate count of people filing new UI claims hit a record high of more than 6 million people in early April.

UI Continued Claimed versus Total Unemployed

First, the contrasts. The Employment and Training Administration publishes weekly counts of UI claims. The UI claims data include both initial claims and continued claims.

  • Initial claims: A count of the new claims people filed to request UI benefits. These claims won’t necessarily all be approved if, for example, a state UI program determines the person isn’t eligible to receive benefits.
  • Continued claims: A count of claims for those who have already filed initial claims and who have experienced a week of unemployment. These people then file a continued claim to receive benefits for that week of unemployment. Continued claims are also called insured unemployment.

Interviewers for the BLS Current Population Survey contact households once a month to ask questions about employment, job search, and other labor market topics for the week containing the 12th of the month. The monthly labor market survey counts people as unemployed if they meet all of these conditions:

  • They are not employed.
  • They could have taken a job if one had been offered.
  • They had made at least one specific, active effort to find employment in the last 4 weeks OR were on temporary layoff.

People counted in the survey as unemployed may or may not be eligible for UI benefits.

Counts of continued UI claims track pretty well with our survey measures of unemployment. The two measures run mostly parallel but at different levels over time. The chart below shows some history through the reference week of the survey data for April 2020.

Continued unemployment insurance claims and total unemployed, 1994–2020, not seasonally adjusted

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

The gap between the two measures shows how the survey captures millions of unemployed people who do not receive UI benefits. This gap partly results from states’ eligibility requirements for their UI programs.

UI Continued Claims versus Job Losers

Our monthly labor market survey lets us see more detail about the characteristics of people who are unemployed. One characteristic is the reason for a person’s unemployment.

  • Some people are labor force entrants or reentrants if they did not have a job immediately before starting their job search.
  • Others quit or leave their job voluntarily and are job leavers.
  • The rest become unemployed by losing their job in one of the following ways:
    • Being permanently laid off
    • Being temporarily laid off
    • Completing a temporary job

People who become unemployed after losing their jobs are job losers. Job losers are more likely to be eligible for UI benefits. Data for this group more closely track the continued claims data.

Continued unemployment insurance claims and unemployed job losers, 1994–2020, not seasonally adjusted

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

To narrow the gap even more, we know the time limits all regular UI programs have for receiving benefits. These limits vary by state, but states rarely offer more than 26 weeks of benefits in their regular program. Our survey estimates of job losers unemployed 26 weeks or fewer track more closely with UI continued claims.

Continued unemployment insurance claims and unemployed job losers who were unemployed 26 weeks or fewer, 1994–2020, not seasonally adjusted

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

Current Trends

Let’s focus on these two measures since last fall. We can see they track even more closely through the April survey reference week.

Continued unemployment insurance claims and unemployed job losers who were unemployed 26 weeks or fewer, November 2019 to May 2020, not seasonally adjusted

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

Labor market data from BLS have always been essential for understanding our economy. Good data—from many sources—are even more essential now, both for guiding the public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic and for tracking its economic impact and recovery. The labor market impacts from the pandemic have been so massive and happened so quickly that policymakers, businesses, and workers have wanted data in almost real time. Our monthly surveys weren’t designed to provide data quite that rapidly, but combining data from multiple sources and understanding how those measures track one another can provide more insight than any single source. We’ve been thinking a lot in recent years about how to complement our survey data with high-frequency information from other sources. I’ve written about some of those efforts and will continue to do so. This pandemic will sharpen our focus on innovating to provide gold standard data for the public good.

Continued unemployment insurance claims and Current Population Survey measures of unemployed, not seasonally adjusted
DateCurrent Population Survey unemployedCurrent Population Survey unemployed job losersCurrent Population Survey unemployed job losers who were unemployed 26 weeks or fewerUnemployment insurance continued claims under state programs

1/15/1994

9,492,0005,215,0004,204,0003,142,036

2/12/1994

9,262,0004,925,0003,968,0003,529,168

3/12/1994

8,874,0004,522,0003,577,0003,255,495

4/16/1994

8,078,0003,832,0002,959,0002,780,268

5/14/1994

7,656,0003,319,0002,520,0002,558,790

6/18/1994

8,251,0003,459,0002,722,0002,399,131

7/16/1994

8,281,0003,701,0002,919,0002,616,255

8/13/1994

7,868,0003,565,0002,832,0002,382,494

9/17/1994

7,379,0003,206,0002,543,0002,095,343

10/15/1994

7,155,0003,168,0002,557,0002,119,751

11/12/1994

6,973,0003,366,0002,759,0002,246,077

12/10/1994

6,690,0003,514,0002,947,0002,501,945

1/14/1995

8,101,0004,350,0003,697,0003,045,968

2/18/1995

7,685,0003,923,0003,288,0003,011,244

3/18/1995

7,480,0003,718,0003,112,0002,872,790

4/15/1995

7,378,0003,479,0002,817,0002,578,113

5/13/1995

7,185,0003,275,0002,697,0002,362,466

6/17/1995

7,727,0003,160,0002,615,0002,321,295

7/15/1995

7,892,0003,470,0002,899,0002,643,997

8/12/1995

7,457,0003,331,0002,823,0002,363,074

9/16/1995

7,167,0003,017,0002,492,0002,110,587

10/14/1995

6,884,0003,104,0002,588,0002,154,971

11/18/1995

7,024,0003,355,0002,851,0002,095,335

12/9/1995

6,872,0003,533,0003,065,0002,596,696

1/13/1996

8,270,0004,425,0003,884,0003,211,081

2/17/1996

7,858,0004,099,0003,517,0003,234,481

3/16/1996

7,700,0003,849,0003,248,0003,086,902

4/13/1996

7,124,0003,610,0002,903,0002,753,405

5/18/1996

7,166,0003,164,0002,643,0002,314,322

6/15/1996

7,377,0003,116,0002,570,0002,285,632

7/13/1996

7,693,0003,323,0002,717,0002,494,226

8/17/1996

6,868,0002,932,0002,451,0002,219,197

9/14/1996

6,700,0002,812,0002,375,0002,007,009

10/12/1996

6,577,0002,757,0002,320,0001,910,925

11/16/1996

6,816,0003,126,0002,677,0002,169,112

12/7/1996

6,680,0003,230,0002,805,0002,406,303

1/18/1997

7,933,0004,027,0003,561,0002,975,311

2/15/1997

7,647,0003,659,0003,158,0002,903,673

3/15/1997

7,399,0003,493,0003,026,0002,719,345

4/12/1997

6,551,0003,050,0002,593,0002,392,620

5/17/1997

6,398,0002,696,0002,318,0002,039,498

6/14/1997

7,094,0002,878,0002,457,0002,008,106

7/12/1997

6,981,0002,895,0002,405,0002,273,294

8/16/1997

6,594,0002,859,0002,374,0002,047,159

9/13/1997

6,403,0002,616,0002,190,0001,797,836

10/18/1997

5,995,0002,525,0002,105,0001,761,841

11/15/1997

5,914,0002,698,0002,319,0001,977,179

12/13/1997

5,957,0003,051,0002,663,0002,251,072

1/17/1998

7,069,0003,556,0003,136,0002,726,043

2/14/1998

6,804,0003,254,0002,868,0002,660,864

3/14/1998

6,816,0003,311,0002,906,0002,590,407

4/18/1998

5,643,0002,647,0002,262,0002,181,018

5/16/1998

5,764,0002,517,0002,196,0001,895,102

6/13/1998

6,534,0002,628,0002,316,0001,908,179

7/18/1998

6,567,0002,847,0002,499,0002,277,800

8/15/1998

6,173,0002,715,0002,365,0001,987,304

9/12/1998

6,039,0002,534,0002,169,0001,805,455

10/17/1998

5,831,0002,426,0002,109,0001,735,477

11/14/1998

5,711,0002,587,0002,299,0001,944,590

12/12/1998

5,565,0002,849,0002,537,0002,232,312

1/16/1999

6,604,0003,394,0003,095,0002,808,153

2/13/1999

6,563,0003,151,0002,859,0002,669,301

3/13/1999

6,119,0002,888,0002,597,0002,581,727

4/17/1999

5,688,0002,633,0002,360,0002,219,359

5/15/1999

5,507,0002,362,0002,107,0002,016,349

6/12/1999

6,271,0002,495,0002,204,0001,963,530

7/17/1999

6,319,0002,729,0002,422,0002,181,103

8/14/1999

5,826,0002,559,0002,251,0001,978,309

9/18/1999

5,661,0002,299,0002,039,0001,728,476

10/16/1999

5,372,0002,162,0001,935,0001,705,790

11/13/1999

5,380,0002,340,0002,092,0001,828,872

12/11/1999

5,245,0002,451,0002,193,0002,094,337

1/15/2000

6,316,0003,134,0002,808,0002,531,224

2/12/2000

6,284,0003,066,0002,771,0002,604,156

3/18/2000

6,069,0002,802,0002,535,0002,277,154

4/15/2000

5,212,0002,259,0002,027,0001,975,507

5/13/2000

5,460,0002,196,0001,957,0001,783,386

6/17/2000

5,959,0002,303,0002,080,0001,812,319

7/15/2000

6,028,0002,508,0002,273,0002,107,129

8/12/2000

5,863,0002,570,0002,317,0001,933,774

9/16/2000

5,359,0002,284,0002,010,0001,709,044

10/14/2000

5,153,0002,105,0001,857,0001,735,297

11/18/2000

5,336,0002,355,0002,108,0001,822,245

12/9/2000

5,264,0002,618,0002,376,0002,261,776

1/13/2001

6,647,0003,449,0003,162,0002,787,024

2/17/2001

6,523,0003,343,0003,061,0002,954,857

3/17/2001

6,509,0003,379,0003,047,0002,932,361

4/14/2001

6,004,0003,027,0002,697,0002,772,097

5/12/2001

5,901,0002,839,0002,578,0002,554,830

6/16/2001

6,816,0003,136,0002,833,0002,634,433

7/14/2001

6,858,0003,372,0003,060,0003,053,451

8/18/2001

7,017,0003,379,0003,004,0002,793,540

9/15/2001

6,766,0003,294,0002,961,0002,630,082

10/13/2001

7,175,0003,753,0003,356,0002,888,718

11/17/2001

7,617,0004,252,0003,738,0003,105,348

12/8/2001

7,773,0004,485,0003,937,0003,604,679

1/12/2002

9,051,0005,449,0004,757,0004,234,835

2/16/2002

8,823,0005,105,0004,457,0004,206,538

3/16/2002

8,776,0004,861,0004,145,0004,078,226

4/13/2002

8,255,0004,550,0003,744,0003,731,669

5/18/2002

7,969,0004,180,0003,293,0003,314,004

6/15/2002

8,758,0004,429,0003,547,0003,248,721

7/13/2002

8,693,0004,607,0003,673,0003,518,751

8/17/2002

8,271,0004,427,0003,545,0003,195,935

9/14/2002

7,790,0004,123,0003,170,0002,947,854

10/12/2002

7,769,0004,151,0003,181,0002,912,625

11/16/2002

8,170,0004,555,0003,521,0003,205,969

12/7/2002

8,209,0004,849,0003,718,0003,481,337

1/18/2003

9,395,0005,641,0004,564,0004,011,764

2/15/2003

9,260,0005,487,0004,336,0004,042,069

3/15/2003

9,018,0005,150,0004,047,0004,009,388

4/12/2003

8,501,0004,716,0003,526,0003,693,322

5/17/2003

8,500,0004,589,0003,475,0003,341,816

6/14/2003

9,649,0004,775,0003,654,0003,334,821

7/12/2003

9,319,0004,958,0003,842,0003,635,324

8/16/2003

8,830,0004,789,0003,715,0003,278,613

9/13/2003

8,436,0004,500,0003,363,0002,985,665

10/18/2003

8,169,0004,319,0003,206,0002,944,236

11/15/2003

8,269,0004,505,0003,401,0003,090,089

12/13/2003

7,945,0004,629,0003,598,0003,338,180

1/17/2004

9,144,0005,195,0004,063,0003,754,598

2/14/2004

8,770,0004,888,0003,838,0003,690,774

3/13/2004

8,834,0004,920,0003,765,0003,466,491

4/17/2004

7,837,0004,253,0003,255,0002,994,939

5/15/2004

7,792,0003,778,0002,845,0002,690,913

6/12/2004

8,616,0003,930,0003,010,0002,685,110

7/17/2004

8,518,0004,233,0003,372,0002,892,369

8/14/2004

7,940,0003,809,0002,982,0002,639,474

9/18/2004

7,545,0003,644,0002,853,0002,342,492

10/16/2004

7,531,0003,653,0002,832,0002,348,403

11/13/2004

7,665,0003,898,0003,103,0002,481,768

12/11/2004

7,599,0004,166,0003,320,0002,781,151

1/15/2005

8,444,0004,771,0003,905,0003,269,319

2/12/2005

8,549,0004,461,0003,624,0003,200,271

3/12/2005

7,986,0004,067,0003,289,0003,044,727

4/16/2005

7,335,0003,559,0002,787,0002,565,759

5/14/2005

7,287,0003,265,0002,606,0002,347,511

6/18/2005

7,870,0003,482,0002,883,0002,354,977

7/16/2005

7,839,0003,618,0003,034,0002,581,153

8/13/2005

7,327,0003,297,0002,705,0002,361,634

9/17/2005

7,259,0003,373,0002,775,0002,293,043

10/15/2005

6,964,0003,162,0002,535,0002,377,075

11/12/2005

7,271,0003,329,0002,687,0002,515,835

12/10/2005

6,956,0003,622,0003,000,0002,659,503

1/14/2006

7,608,0003,990,0003,419,0003,010,836

2/18/2006

7,692,0003,846,0003,233,0002,865,435

3/18/2006

7,255,0003,707,0003,108,0002,712,772

4/15/2006

6,804,0003,426,0002,771,0002,430,217

5/13/2006

6,655,0003,152,0002,546,0002,183,176

6/17/2006

7,341,0003,222,0002,718,0002,177,172

7/15/2006

7,602,0003,374,0002,820,0002,450,260

8/12/2006

7,086,0003,132,0002,585,0002,283,575

9/16/2006

6,625,0002,878,0002,366,0002,022,552

10/14/2006

6,272,0002,724,0002,247,0002,077,157

11/11/2006

6,576,0003,025,0002,555,0002,231,475

12/9/2006

6,491,0003,374,0002,928,0002,536,673

1/13/2007

7,649,0004,127,0003,668,0002,887,810

2/17/2007

7,400,0003,942,0003,425,0003,037,700

3/17/2007

6,913,0003,487,0002,987,0002,788,224

4/14/2007

6,532,0003,249,0002,724,0002,598,802

5/12/2007

6,486,0003,070,0002,591,0002,293,089

6/16/2007

7,295,0003,241,0002,752,0002,241,672

7/14/2007

7,556,0003,730,0003,157,0002,548,427

8/18/2007

7,088,0003,472,0002,899,0002,335,412

9/15/2007

6,952,0003,208,0002,645,0002,128,411

10/13/2007

6,773,0003,259,0002,668,0002,143,999

11/10/2007

6,917,0003,382,0002,814,0002,260,475

12/8/2007

7,371,0004,013,0003,396,0002,665,956

1/12/2008

8,221,0004,608,0003,951,0003,242,075

2/16/2008

7,953,0004,471,0003,805,0003,265,157

3/15/2008

8,027,0004,555,0003,922,0003,220,809

4/12/2008

7,287,0003,931,0003,212,0003,018,445

5/17/2008

8,076,0003,949,0003,204,0002,759,158

6/14/2008

8,933,0004,201,0003,451,0002,801,895

7/12/2008

9,433,0004,562,0003,782,0003,097,770

8/16/2008

9,479,0004,735,0003,855,0003,112,252

9/13/2008

9,199,0004,699,0003,655,0002,957,202

10/18/2008

9,469,0005,138,0004,006,0003,188,153

11/15/2008

10,015,0005,746,0004,609,0003,714,261

12/13/2008

10,999,0006,878,0005,483,0004,531,208

1/17/2009

13,009,0008,633,0007,041,0005,647,319

2/14/2009

13,699,0009,098,0007,380,0006,031,637

3/14/2009

13,895,0009,315,0007,347,0006,354,009

4/18/2009

13,248,0008,687,0006,347,0006,237,658

5/16/2009

13,973,0008,930,0006,531,0006,049,295

6/13/2009

15,095,0009,194,0006,567,0006,012,730

7/18/2009

15,201,0009,447,0006,275,0005,989,877

8/15/2009

14,823,0009,316,0005,955,0005,578,533

9/12/2009

14,538,0009,170,0005,520,0005,131,447

10/17/2009

14,547,0009,176,0005,482,0004,893,301

11/14/2009

14,407,0009,130,0005,237,0004,996,155

12/12/2009

14,740,0009,822,0005,881,0005,262,045

1/16/2010

16,147,00010,574,0006,302,0005,538,244

2/13/2010

15,991,00010,664,0006,347,0005,465,212

3/13/2010

15,678,00010,311,0005,880,0005,270,644

4/17/2010

14,609,0009,110,0004,607,0004,715,968

5/15/2010

14,369,0008,812,0004,484,0004,333,973

6/12/2010

14,885,0008,769,0004,606,0004,226,459

7/17/2010

15,137,0008,964,0004,695,0004,471,386

8/14/2010

14,759,0008,894,0004,724,0004,138,097

9/18/2010

14,140,0008,651,0004,526,0003,737,930

10/16/2010

13,903,0008,331,0004,306,0003,697,842

11/13/2010

14,282,0008,926,0004,787,0003,804,696

12/11/2010

13,997,0008,995,0004,986,0004,119,344

1/15/2011

14,937,0009,520,0005,545,0004,552,936

2/12/2011

14,542,0009,212,0005,403,0004,521,733

3/12/2011

14,060,0008,841,0004,874,0004,215,458

4/16/2011

13,237,0007,958,0004,276,0003,726,578

5/14/2011

13,421,0007,885,0004,051,0003,492,720

6/18/2011

14,409,0007,940,0004,315,0003,454,731

7/16/2011

14,428,0008,107,0004,441,0003,695,537

8/13/2011

14,008,0007,897,0004,395,0003,497,400

9/17/2011

13,520,0007,636,0003,849,0003,150,942

10/15/2011

13,102,0007,390,0003,911,0003,141,911

11/12/2011

12,613,0007,201,0003,813,0003,323,025

12/10/2011

12,692,0007,691,0004,392,0003,571,487

1/14/2012

13,541,0008,234,0004,977,0004,019,589

2/18/2012

13,430,0007,866,0004,783,0003,834,179

3/17/2012

12,904,0007,415,0004,394,0003,650,071

4/14/2012

11,910,0006,555,0003,580,0003,377,436

5/12/2012

12,271,0006,607,0003,601,0003,079,181

6/16/2012

13,184,0006,927,0003,973,0003,069,545

7/14/2012

13,400,0007,151,0004,248,0003,288,629

8/18/2012

12,696,0006,820,0004,003,0003,068,519

9/15/2012

11,742,0006,161,0003,497,0002,796,675

10/13/2012

11,741,0006,125,0003,428,0002,772,151

11/10/2012

11,404,0006,069,0003,520,0002,902,343

12/8/2012

11,844,0006,592,0004,086,0003,203,819

1/12/2013

13,181,0007,575,0005,046,0003,661,355

2/16/2013

12,500,0007,130,0004,468,0003,483,983

3/16/2013

11,815,0006,638,0004,024,0003,345,945

4/13/2013

11,014,0006,079,0003,642,0003,049,657

5/18/2013

11,302,0005,751,0003,437,0002,752,679

6/15/2013

12,248,0005,939,0003,794,0002,745,766

7/13/2013

12,083,0005,934,0003,771,0002,995,510

8/17/2013

11,462,0005,856,0003,677,0002,772,037

9/14/2013

10,885,0005,470,0003,409,0002,412,302

10/12/2013

10,773,0005,649,0003,657,0002,418,279

11/9/2013

10,271,0005,400,0003,371,0002,514,678

12/7/2013

9,984,0005,460,0003,492,0002,838,295

1/18/2014

10,855,0006,152,0004,163,0003,334,697

2/15/2014

10,893,0006,024,0004,089,0003,329,510

3/15/2014

10,537,0005,779,0003,853,0003,096,231

4/12/2014

9,079,0004,972,0003,100,0002,721,859

5/17/2014

9,443,0004,613,0002,948,0002,421,319

6/14/2014

9,893,0004,670,0003,239,0002,372,393

7/12/2014

10,307,0004,867,0003,359,0002,518,959

8/16/2014

9,787,0004,750,0003,442,0002,363,077

9/13/2014

8,962,0004,176,0002,774,0002,076,867

10/18/2014

8,680,0003,995,0002,682,0002,046,031

11/15/2014

8,630,0004,182,0002,954,0002,158,767

12/13/2014

8,331,0004,355,0003,083,0002,445,747

1/17/2015

9,498,0004,912,0003,601,0002,750,868

2/14/2015

9,095,0004,721,0003,514,0002,720,615

3/14/2015

8,682,0004,503,0003,259,0002,674,331

4/18/2015

7,966,0003,977,0002,789,0002,251,252

5/16/2015

8,370,0003,962,0002,850,0002,047,456

6/13/2015

8,638,0003,951,0003,029,0002,066,476

7/18/2015

8,805,0004,204,0003,207,0002,217,720

8/15/2015

8,162,0003,987,0002,968,0002,124,998

9/12/2015

7,628,0003,509,0002,647,0001,903,085

10/17/2015

7,597,0003,576,0002,678,0001,825,692

11/14/2015

7,573,0003,633,0002,815,0001,970,435

12/12/2015

7,542,0003,820,0002,964,0002,255,937

1/16/2016

8,309,0004,287,0003,357,0002,624,638

2/13/2016

8,219,0004,244,0003,299,0002,582,311

3/12/2016

8,116,0004,149,0003,123,0002,461,697

4/16/2016

7,413,0003,716,0002,761,0002,126,849

5/14/2016

7,207,0003,322,0002,480,0001,982,730

6/18/2016

8,144,0003,677,0002,855,0001,975,334

7/16/2016

8,267,0003,869,0003,001,0002,109,038

8/13/2016

7,996,0003,787,0002,918,0002,030,018

9/17/2016

7,658,0003,536,0002,660,0001,728,317

10/15/2016

7,447,0003,352,0002,551,0001,710,066

11/12/2016

7,066,0003,271,0002,490,0001,828,034

12/10/2016

7,170,0003,668,0002,917,0002,071,781

1/14/2017

8,149,0004,361,0003,481,0002,437,106

2/18/2017

7,887,0004,184,0003,335,0002,364,751

3/18/2017

7,284,0003,812,0002,990,0002,256,527

4/15/2017

6,555,0003,369,0002,561,0001,984,675

5/13/2017

6,572,0003,017,0002,317,0001,757,086

6/17/2017

7,250,0003,359,0002,698,0001,780,061

7/15/2017

7,441,0003,519,0002,822,0001,936,985

8/12/2017

7,287,0003,536,0002,866,0001,851,667

9/16/2017

6,556,0002,992,0002,314,0001,611,895

10/14/2017

6,242,0002,859,0002,252,0001,572,784

11/11/2017

6,286,0002,907,0002,289,0001,672,980

12/9/2017

6,278,0003,298,0002,715,0001,909,886

1/13/2018

7,189,0003,891,0003,259,0002,242,438

2/17/2018

7,091,0003,716,0003,069,0002,226,157

3/17/2018

6,671,0003,375,0002,799,0002,082,891

4/14/2018

5,932,0002,805,0002,272,0001,841,572

5/12/2018

5,756,0002,493,0002,004,0001,584,129

6/16/2018

6,812,0003,022,0002,511,0001,564,998

7/14/2018

6,730,0003,164,0002,551,0001,738,468

8/18/2018

6,370,0002,885,0002,291,0001,605,843

9/15/2018

5,766,0002,474,0001,912,0001,396,832

10/13/2018

5,771,0002,510,0001,958,0001,353,628

11/10/2018

5,650,0002,598,0002,107,0001,429,209

12/8/2018

6,029,0002,947,0002,443,0001,703,504

1/12/2019

7,140,0003,791,0003,291,0002,070,444

2/16/2019

6,625,0003,300,0002,760,0002,107,108

3/16/2019

6,382,0003,098,0002,513,0001,990,542

4/13/2019

5,387,0002,484,0001,984,0001,686,671

5/18/2019

5,503,0002,281,0001,783,0001,491,921

6/15/2019

6,292,0002,703,0002,196,0001,538,052

7/13/2019

6,556,0002,986,0002,483,0001,673,714

8/17/2019

6,203,0002,906,0002,418,0001,594,845

9/14/2019

5,465,0002,227,0001,711,0001,379,722

10/12/2019

5,510,0002,340,0001,889,0001,366,544

11/9/2019

5,441,0002,561,0002,123,0001,439,799

12/7/2019

5,503,0002,752,0002,361,0001,707,456

1/18/2020

6,504,0003,267,0002,808,0002,053,978

2/15/2020

6,218,0003,151,0002,712,0002,036,213

3/14/2020

7,370,0004,441,0003,907,0002,055,283

4/18/2020

22,504,00020,384,00019,953,00017,601,283
Continued unemployment insurance claims and unemployed job losers who were unemployed 26 weeks or fewer, not seasonally adjusted
DateCurrent Population Survey unemployed job losers who were unemployed 26 weeks or fewerUnemployment insurance continued claims under state programs

11/2/2019

1,428,992

11/9/2019

2,123,0001,439,799

11/16/2019

1,523,691

11/23/2019

1,488,691

11/30/2019

1,733,682

12/7/2019

2,361,0001,707,456

12/14/2019

1,780,860

12/21/2019

1,760,439

12/28/2019

2,124,746

1/4/2020

2,229,673

1/11/2020

2,114,161

1/18/2020

2,808,0002,053,978

1/25/2020

2,125,243

2/1/2020

2,060,389

2/8/2020

2,073,658

2/15/2020

2,712,0002,036,213

2/22/2020

2,079,249

2/29/2020

2,032,792

3/7/2020

1,954,265

3/14/2020

3,907,0002,055,283

3/21/2020

3,391,238

3/28/2020

8,107,677

4/4/2020

12,356,980

4/11/2020

16,138,295

4/18/2020

19,953,00017,601,283

4/25/2020

21,576,373

5/2/2020

20,733,760

5/9/2020

22,637,743

5/16/2020

18,855,114