Tag Archives: Big Data

BLS Big Data Delivers Hurricane Flood Zone Maps

Information is key to preparing for a natural disaster. That’s why we have updated our maps of businesses and employment in flood zones for states on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts that are vulnerable to hurricanes and tropical storms.

These maps combine data from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages with the most up-to-date information from the U.S. Census Bureau and U.S. Geological Survey. The result is high-resolution graphics for every county with hurricane flood zones along or inland from the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts.

The Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages is our “Big Data” program. It gathers data from 9.9 million reports that almost every employer in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands files each quarter. We have been producing maps of businesses and employment in disaster areas since 2001, when we created zip code maps and tables of Lower Manhattan. We began mapping hurricane zones in 2014, combining BLS data with flood zones created by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and state emergency management agencies.

These maps are one way we use Big Data to create new products without increasing the burden on our respondents. Within BLS, we use these maps for research into the data collection and economic effects of a storm. We also provide these maps to state labor market information offices to use for their statistical analysis and emergency response.

Hurricane maps highlight how we use emerging technologies. We create these maps with open source mapping software, part of our open data practices that make it easier for decision makers to get and use the data.

This isn’t our only example of matching Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages data with data from other federal agencies to deliver new insights. We have matched our data with publicly available Internal Revenue Service data to measure employment and wages in nonprofit organizations. We also are working with our colleagues at the Bureau of Economic Analysis to improve understanding of foreign direct investment in the United States. When these data become available, users can analyze employment and wages by industry and occupation in firms with and without foreign direct investment.

All of these efforts improve the quality and breadth of information available for decision makers. If you have ideas about other partnerships with our Big Data team, please send us a message or give us a call!

Small Businesses: This is for YOU!

This week is National Small Business Week, which recognizes the critical contributions of America’s small business owners and workers to our economy. The U.S. economy is fueled by small businesses, which employ about 69 million workers!

Here at the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, we work closely with small businesses every day in two main ways:

  • Small businesses participate in our voluntary statistical surveys, so thanks for your cooperation!
  • BLS data help small businesses make smart decisions.

To celebrate Small Business Week, this blog shares some information about small businesses in our current economy and some testimonials from small business owners who use BLS data.

“As the owner of All Things Career Consulting (and a self-proclaimed data geek), I spend a lot of time working with organizations to develop recruiting programs. I also provide individual coaching on navigating career change, especially military transitions. What I like about BLS data is that they help me tell my clients a story about the labor force. It’s important for both employers and employees to understand what jobs are growing and how things such as the unemployment rate impact the job market. So many times people run with a myth that they have heard without digging into the data to find the truth. BLS data help them to set realistic expectations about job prospects, as well as salaries and benefits.” --Lisa Parrott, Owner (Overland Park, Kansas)

 

What is a small business?

We define small establishments as establishments with fewer than 100 workers. What is an establishment? It’s the physical location of an economic activity—for example, a factory, mine, store, or office. An establishment is not necessarily a firm; it may be a branch plant, for example, or a warehouse. Thus, small establishments may include a “mom and pop” grocery store or a small storage facility.“My company, Cornerstone Macro, provides timely analysis of macroeconomic trends to institutional investors. The Bureau’s comprehensive, reliable, and objective statistics – from employment, to inflation, to productivity – are essential to our understanding of the cyclical and secular forces shaping the investment landscape. Without these data, we would not be able to provide best-in-class research to our customers.” --Nancy R. Lazar, Co-Founder (New York, New York)

What is the source of these data?

Each quarter we publish counts of employment and wages reported by employers. These counts, from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages, cover more than 97 percent of U.S. jobs. We have detail available at the county, metropolitan area, state, and national levels by industry.

So the quarterly census doesn’t cover every worker in the United States, but it is very close!

How many small businesses are there and how many people do they employ?

Percent distribution of establishments and employment by size of establishment, private sector, March 2017

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

Highlights:

  • About 69 million workers—57 percent of all private sector workers—were employed in over 9 million small establishments during March 2017.
  • Small establishments make up over 97 percent of all establishments in the nation. The remaining establishments (181,000), those with 100 or more workers, employed over 51 million workers.
  • A whopping 62 percent of establishments fall within the smallest size class, fewer than 5 employees.

“My company, Piedmont Grocery Co., has been a family owned independent purveyor of fine foods and spirits in Oakland, CA since 1902. We use the Bureau’s consumer price indexes to calculate inflation rates that are used to determine incremental rent increases. Without these timely and objective stats, we could potentially be paying more for our rent than is necessary.” --Amy Pence, Vice President (Oakland, California)

In what industries do we find small businesses?

Percentage of private employment in each industry that is in small establishments, March 2017

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

Highlights:

  • Employment in small establishments varies among industries.
  • Real estate and rental and leasing, construction, and wholesale trade have much of their employment in small establishments. It’s more than 80 percent in real estate and rental and leasing.
  • In contrast, 36 percent of manufacturing employment and 43 percent of transportation and warehousing employment are in small establishments.

“QED Consulting provides consulting and training in Leadership, Ethics, Culture, Diversity, & Inclusion to global Fortune 500 companies, governments, and international organizations. We use the Bureau’s data on demographic trends to illustrate the need for organizational policies that make diversity and inclusion work. These objective statistics assist us to help our clients be best in class in terms of diversity and inclusion.” --Alan Richter, Founder and President (New York, New York)

Want to learn more about small businesses? Check out the most recent news release to get all the latest numbers. See our Frequently Asked Questions, or contact us at (202) 691-6567 or by email.

Thank you, small businesses, for your participation and know that we are here to help you in your statistical needs. Happy Small Business Week!

 

Percent distribution of establishments and employment by size of establishment, private sector, March 2017
Establishment size Establishments Employment
Fewer than 5 employees 62% 7%
5–9 employees 15 8
10–19 employees 11 11
20–49 employees 7 18
50–99 employees 2 13
100 or more employees 2 43
Percentage of private employment in each industry that is in small establishments, March 2017
Industry Percent
Real estate and rental and leasing 82%
Construction 74
Wholesale trade 71
Retail trade 64
Services 59
Mining 51
Finance and insurance 51
Transportation and warehousing 43
Manufacturing 36

Innovating for the Future

Erica L. Groshen was the 14th Commissioner of Labor Statistics. She served from January 2013 to January 2017. This is her final post for Commissioner’s Corner.

Image of former BLS Commissioner Erica L. Groshen

It didn’t take long after I became Commissioner of Labor Statistics in January 2013 for me to appreciate the skill, dedication, and innovation of the staff that works here. Whether they’re doing sampling, data collection, estimation, or dissemination; whether they’re the IT professionals or the statisticians or the HR staff; whether they’re the newest employees who are so tech-savvy or the more senior employees who hold a wealth of institutional knowledge. To a person they are phenomenal. I am honored to have had the pleasure of leading them — and letting them lead me — during the past 4 years.

 

I have had many opportunities to observe and encourage innovation during my tenure at the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, from listening tours to senior staff conferences to regional office visits to discussions with a wide variety of stakeholders. From these efforts, we have identified several activities that will help us develop and implement the next generation of labor statistics. These days, we call these efforts a variety of names, such as “modernization” and “reengineering.” But, in truth, they just continue the impressive progress that has been the hallmark of BLS for the past 133 years.

In my final Commissioner’s Corner post, I want to tell you a little about some of our current reengineering efforts.

One of the things we do best at BLS is data collection, largely because we are always looking for ways to improve. Recent efforts include identifying alternative data sources, expanding electronic collection, and “scraping” information directly from the Internet. These efforts can expand the information we provide, lessen the burden we place on employers and households that provide data, and maybe even save some money to provide taxpayers the best value for their data dollar.

These efforts are not new. One source of alternative data we’ve used for many years comes from state unemployment insurance filings, which identify nearly every employer in the country. We tabulate these data but also use them as the source of our sample of employers for certain surveys and as a benchmark of detailed employment by industry. We also use information from private sources and from administrative sources, like vital statistics. Our latest efforts involve examining techniques to combine data across multiple sources, including mixing survey and nonsurvey data.

We want to give employers the opportunity to leverage the electronic data they already keep so it’s easier to respond to our surveys. These efforts include allowing employers to provide electronic information in multiple formats; identifying a single source of electronic data from employers, reducing the number of locations and number of requests made to multiple sites of the same organization; and working with employers to allow BLS to access their data directly from the Internet. We rely on good corporate citizens to supply the information that we use to produce important economic data. Making data collection easier is a win-win.

The innovation doesn’t stop at collection. We are using electronic text analysis systems extensively to streamline some of our data-processing activities. Much of the information we collect is in the form of text, such as a description of an industry or occupation, details about a workplace injury, or summaries of employee benefit plans. Transforming text into a classification system for tabulation and publication used to be a manual task. BLS has begun to transform this task through the use of machine-learning techniques, where computers learn by reviewing greater and greater amounts of information, resulting in accurate classification. As we expand our skills in this area and find more uses for these techniques, the benefits include accurate and consistent data and greater opportunities for our staff to use their brainpower to focus on new, unique, and unusual situations.

We are also modernizing our outputs, producing more with the information we have. For example, we have begun several matching projects, combining data from two or more sources to produce new information. One example is new information on nonprofit organizations. By linking our employment data with nonprofit status obtained from the Internal Revenue Service, we now have employment data separately for the for-profit and nonprofit sectors. And we took that effort one step further and produced compensation information for these sectors as well. Look for more output from these matching efforts in the future.

Finally, we’ve made great strides in how we present our information, including expanded graphics and video. And we are not stopping there. Each year we are expanding the number of data releases that include a companion graphics package. We are developing prototypes of a new generation of data releases, with more graphics and links to data series. And we have more videos to come.

My 4 years as Commissioner of Labor Statistics have flown by. I’m excited to see so many innovations begin, thrive, and foster additional innovations. I have no doubt that the culture of innovation at BLS will continue. As my term comes to an end, I know now more than ever that the skill, dedication, and creativity of the BLS staff will lead this agency to even greater advances in the years to come.

BLS Microdata Now More Easily Accessible to Researchers across the Country

I am pleased to announce that BLS is now part of the Federal Statistical Research Data Center Network.

Researchers at universities, nonprofits, and government agencies can now go to 24 secure research data centers across the United States to analyze microdata from our National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth and our Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses. Before, researchers had to visit our headquarters in Washington, D.C., to use these data.Image of researchers examining data.

Making our underlying data more accessible for researchers from coast to coast is a huge step forward, and I hope it will lead to a surge in research using BLS data. I believe that having more researchers use BLS data not only will showcase new uses of the data but improve our products by encouraging researchers from BLS and other organizations to collaborate. It also supports transparency because external researchers can analyze inputs to our published statistics.

Another key benefit to having BLS data alongside datasets from the U.S. Census Bureau and the National Center for Health Statistics is that researchers can combine data from two or more agencies. Using multiple datasets allows researchers to match data to answer new questions with no more burden on our respondents. Put simply, more data = better research = better decisions that rely on research.

Researchers are enthusiastic about adding BLS data to the research data center network.

“We at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta are excited that more BLS microdata are available to researchers. Policy questions are usually complicated. Matched data from different sources can give researchers a much better understanding of economic relationships. That will help us provide more informed policy advice,” said John Robertson, senior policy adviser at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

Over the next year, we will add more BLS data to the research data centers based on user demand.

Researchers can also still visit us at our D.C. headquarters to access our full suite of microdata. To learn more and to apply, see our BLS Restricted Data Access page.

Entrepreneurship Facts: Announcing New Research Data on Job Creation and Destruction by Firm Age and Size

I’m delighted to announce that we now have new research data on job gains and losses by firm age and size across industries and states.

For many years, policymakers, economists, and others have debated whether small or large firms create more jobs. Our Business Employment Dynamics program, which measures gross job gains and losses to help us understand net employment changes, informs that debate with data on firm size. A related question is whether startups or older establishments create more jobs. Again, BLS has a stat for that. We have data on employment and business survival rates by the age of the establishment.

While it’s useful to know the age of an establishment—that is, a single location of a business—for some questions, we need to know the age of the firm. A firm may include several or even many establishments. To understand entrepreneurship in particular, we want to know how both the age and size of firms affect job gains, job losses, and employment growth.

With these new data we can answer many interesting questions, including:

  • How much do older firms contribute to job growth? Firms 10 years or older created 800,000 jobs, or 29 percent of the total 2.7 million net employment gain in the year ending March 2015. See the chart below.
  • How much do startup firms contribute to job growth? In the year ending March 2015, startup firms—firms less than 1 year old—created 1.7 million jobs or 60 percent of total employment growth. More than half these jobs were from firms with fewer than 10 employees.
  • How does the age or size of the firm affect the rate of business closures? In 2015, 788,000 establishments closed. Of these, 55 percent were from firms 10 years or older; 16 percent were from firms 5 to 9 years old; and 28 percent were from firms less than 4 years old. Of the establishments that closed from March 2014 to March 2015, 91,000 of them, or 12 percent of the total, had 500 or more employees.
  • Which firm-age group accounted for most job losses during the last two recessions? Firms 10 years or older lost the most jobs during both recessions. Again, see the chart below.

net-job-changes-by-firm-age

The new research data measure annual gross job gains and gross job losses by firm age and size from March of one year to March of the next. We get the data on firms from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages by linking individual establishments over time. Besides firm age and size, we also measure establishment age and size. We have two methods to examine size. One method compares the current size of firms or establishments with the size at the beginning of the year (the base-sizing method). The other method compares the current size with the average size over the year (the average-sizing method).

I really want to know how you like these new data and what we can do to make them more useful. I invite you to explore the data and share your comments. Your feedback will help us develop the dataset and possibly move it into our regular production. Please write your comments below, or you can email the Business Employment Dynamics staff.