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Tag Archives: Time Use

Celebrating Women’s History Month with BLS Data

The U.S. Congress passed Public Law 100-9 on March 12, 1987, designating March as Women’s History Month. Beginning in 1995, each President has issued annual proclamations designating March as Women’s History Month.

Public Law 100-9 states in part:

“Whereas American women have played and continue to play a critical economic, cultural, and social role in every sphere of our Nation’s life by constituting a significant portion of the labor force working in and outside of the home;”

We at BLS have a lot to say about the critical role women have played in the economic health of our nation, especially their role in the labor market.

Let’s begin with the theme of this year’s Women’s History Month, “Providing healing and promoting hope.” This theme is especially relevant today as women serve on the front lines of the world’s battle against the COVID-19 pandemic. But women have been providing healing and promoting hope since time immemorial. BLS doesn’t have data going back that far, but we have interesting data on women employed in the health care and social assistance industry that highlight the critical importance of women in maintaining the health of our nation.

Women made up 77.6 percent of health care and social assistance employment

In 2021, 16.4 million women were employed in the health care and social assistance industry. This was 77.6 percent of the total 21.2 million workers in the industry. Looking at the component industries that make up health care and social assistance, women accounted for 75.0 percent of total employment in hospitals, 77.4 percent of total employment in health services, except hospitals, and 84.0 percent of total employment in social assistance. Social assistance includes child day care services, vocational rehabilitation services, and services for the elderly and disabled, among other industries.

Women employed in health care and social assistance, 2011 to 2021

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

Women providing care to household members

The excerpt from Public Law 100-9 I shared earlier mentioned activity both inside and outside the home. Data from the American Time Use Survey can shed light on the many ways women provide healing and promote hope, even when it is not directly related to their paid employment.

From May to December 2020, 84.5 percent of women engaged in household activities on a given day. Women who engaged in household activities spent an average of 2.77 hours per day on them as their primary activity.

Almost 25 percent of women also cared for and helped household members on a given day. These women averaged 2.41 hours per day caring for a household member as their primary activity.

Among women who were mothers, the time they spent caring for and helping household members varied depending on the age of the children and the employment status of the parent. Women of all marital and employment statuses averaged 2.1 hours per day caring for household members if their youngest child was under age 18 and 3.25 hours a day if their youngest child was under age 6. The averages were higher if women were not employed: 2.95 hours per day for women with children under age 18 and 3.88 hours for women with children under age 6.

Average hours per day mothers with children in the household spent caring for and helping household members, May to December 2020

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

The COVID-19 pandemic may have had several effects. Mothers of children under age 13 who were employed spent 7.3 hours per day during the pandemic in 2020 providing secondary childcare. Secondary childcare is when parents had at least one child under age 13 in their care while doing activities other than primary childcare. This was up by 1.5 hours per day from 2019. Employed fathers spent about 1 hour more per day providing secondary childcare in 2020 than in 2019.

Mothers and fathers of children under 13 who were not employed spent more time providing secondary childcare than those who were employed. Mothers who were not employed spent 8.7 hours per day providing secondary childcare, and fathers who were not employed spent 8.3 hours in 2020. Both figures are essentially unchanged from 2019.

Average hours per day spent providing secondary childcare, mothers and fathers of children under age 13, May to December, 2019 and 2020

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

This March, we are happy once again to celebrate the women who have made an impact both in the workforce and at home. Now more than ever, the world has come to count on women as healers and caregivers. On behalf of everyone at BLS, I am grateful for all the women who continue this crucial work. Not just this month, but every month.

Women employed in health care and social assistance, 2011 to 2021
YearTotal employedWomen employedPercent of total employed that are women

2011

18,902,00014,836,00078.5%

2012

19,405,00015,209,00078.4

2013

19,562,00015,343,00078.4

2014

19,577,00015,379,00078.6

2015

20,077,00015,752,00078.5

2016

20,589,00016,212,00078.7

2017

20,720,00016,271,00078.5

2018

21,133,00016,558,00078.4

2019

21,701,00016,959,00078.1

2020

20,736,00016,141,00077.8

2021

21,204,00016,446,00077.6
Average hours per day mothers with children in the household spent caring for and helping household members, May to December 2020
Employment statusYoungest child under age 18Youngest child under age 6

Total

2.103.25

Not employed

2.953.88

Employed

1.642.81

Employed full time

1.472.65

Employed part time

2.123.18
Average hours per day spent providing secondary childcare, mothers and fathers of children under age 13, May to December, 2019 and 2020
YearEmployed fathersEmployed mothersNot employed fathersNot employed mothers

2019

4.295.788.298.76

2020

5.247.258.328.66

What Have You Been Looking for on the BLS Website?

In 2021, the BLS public website welcomed nearly 29 million users, who viewed just over 158 million pages. Wow, that’s a lot of data! It shows the extensive and growing interest in information about our economy. Let’s take a quick look back over the past year. What are the topics of interest? We see clear trends and a few surprises.

From its humble beginnings more than a quarter century ago, www.bls.gov has become the primary way we make the latest BLS data and analysis available to the public.

BLS website homepage, September 1995
First edition of the BLS website, 1995

Today, thousands of users get their first glimpse of the latest economic data through the website or through email alerts and tweets that link to the website. National economic news on employment, inflation, productivity, and other topics is first available on the website, with about 150 national releases each year. Not to be outdone, BLS regional office staff around the country last year posted nearly 1,000 regional and local news releases on the website.

And you came to check out those data—all 29 million of you.

Here’s a look at the five subject homepages that saw the greatest increase in page views from 2020 to 2021. You’ll note that all are timely topics.

  • The Business Response Survey to the Coronavirus Pandemic was a special data collection effort. Information from this survey was first available late in 2020, so the 166-percent increase in page views in 2021 is not surprising, especially given the great interest in all COVID-19 information. Results from a second round of this survey, with updated questions, will be available February 9, 2022.
  • Information from the Consumer Price Index also had more than a 100-percent increase in page views from 2020 to 2021, 106 percent increase to be exact. This is not a surprise, given the significant rise in prices recently.
  • Interest in inflation throughout the supply chain also led to a 60-percent increase in page views for Producer Price Indexes data.
  • BLS has been collecting data on Work Stoppages (strikes and lockouts) for many years, but interest in these data grew in 2021, perhaps because of several high-profile stoppages. There was a 25-percent increase in page views for these data.
  • Rounding out the top five was an 18-percent increase in page views for Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey data. With record numbers of job openings and heightened interest in churn in the labor force, these data have garnered much attention recently. We also began publishing a news release on state data in 2021 to meet the growing need for geographic information on job openings and labor turnover.

Turning to analytical data, some of the most viewed pages were those focusing on fast growing industries, inflation at both the consumer and producer level, and the impact of COVID-19 on many aspects of the economy, such as unemployment and food prices. But viewers were also attracted to some unique topics:

  • The most read Commissioner’s Corner blog was about the 17-year cycle of cicadas, with a look at economic trends during past cicada invasions.
A cicada
A group of friends and family watching a football game on TV

We welcome our 29 million website visitors and encourage you to check back regularly. Your interests drive our commitment to provide timely research on relevant topics. There’s new content every business day, so you never know what new research may be right around the corner in 2022. It will all be at www.bls.gov. See you there!

BLS website homepage in 2022
BLS website homepage in 2022

Spend Thanksgiving Day with BLS!

Thanksgiving is right around the corner. As we start to think about how we will celebrate, it might be hard to imagine the ties between BLS statistics and celebrating Thanksgiving. So, here’s a short tour of a typical Thanksgiving Day as seen through a few BLS statistics. Enjoy!

9:00 a.m. Put the turkey in the oven

All good chefs know the key to a successful Thanksgiving feast is to get the turkey in the oven bright and early. Whether you are roasting your turkey or firing up a deep fryer in the driveway, you will have to pay more for the fuel. The Consumer Price Index for household energy was pretty stable through 2019 and the first half of 2020 but then started a steady rise in September 2020.

Consumer Price Index for household energy, 2019–21

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

10:00 a.m. Watch the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused ups and downs in the labor market, much like the impact of a windy day for the famous balloons in Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Keeping with the department store theme, employment in department stores plunged 25.3 percent in April 2020 but then rose 14.1 percent June 2020. These gyrations were more dramatic than the broader retail trade sector.

Monthly percent change in employment in retail trade and department stores, 2019–21

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

2:00 p.m. Scope out Black Friday deals

After watching the parade, it’s time to plan our Black Friday shopping! As consumers, we are always trying to get more for less. In the retail trade industry, it turns out they are doing just that. The industry has produced more output with steady or decreasing hours worked. The result is a corresponding increase in labor productivity. Now, only if we could prepare a bigger Thanksgiving feast in less time!

Indexes for labor productivity, hours worked, and output in retail trade, 2007–20

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

4:00 p.m. Play touch football

We need to make some room of the feast we are about to enjoy, so we assemble willing participants and play some touch football in the yard. The American Time Use Survey is the best source of information on how Americans spend their time each day. In this case, let’s compare how much time people spend playing sports versus how much time they spend watching sports on TV. We’ll look only at time spent in these activities on weekend days and holidays. The survey does not have details on what people watch on TV, but we can assume some time reported here is spent watching sports.

Average hours spent watching TV and playing sports, weekend days and holidays, 2019

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

We can see that Americans, on average, easily spend more time watching TV—3.36 hours—than playing sports—0.34 hours. But what is more interesting is that, on average, those who watch TV watch about 24 percent more than the overall population. However, those who play sports play, on average, nearly 6 times as many hours as the average for the population.

6:00 p.m. Thanksgiving feast

No matter what is on your dinner table this Thanksgiving, chances are it will cost more than previous years. All six major grocery store food groups in the Consumer Price Index for food at home continued to rise sharply in October 2021. Even if you decide to order out, it will set you back a bit more this year. Both full-service meals and limited services meals rose nearly 1 percent in October 2021.

Consumer Price Indexes for food at home and food away from home, 2018–21

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

7:00 p.m. Watch football

Now that we’ve finished our delicious feast, it’s a time-honored tradition to watch a bit of football on TV. If you are buying a new TV for this holiday, you can expect to pay a bit more. After years of steady declines, import prices for television and video receivers have reversed trend in 2021, much like a wide receiver changing direction to find an opening and catch a game-winning touchdown pass!

Import price index for television and video receivers, 2011–21

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

9:00 p.m. Say goodbye

It’s hard to say goodbye to your friends and family. In the United States, however, the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey is showing that workers are saying goodbye to their employers more often these days. The number of quits has been rising steadily since the shock of the pandemic affected layoffs and discharges in early 2020. (It’s only a coincidence that the layoffs line in the chart below looks like the outline of a pilgrim’s hat.)

Quits, layoffs and discharges, and other job separations, 2019–21

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

Now we’ve come to the end of our Thanksgiving feast of BLS data. Our hunger for the premier statistics on the U.S. labor force, prices, and productivity, has been satisfied, and we can rest easily knowing there’s a stat for that!

Consumer Price Index for household energy
MonthIndex

Jan 2019

100.000

Feb 2019

99.662

Mar 2019

100.046

Apr 2019

99.952

May 2019

99.679

Jun 2019

99.258

Jul 2019

99.415

Aug 2019

99.253

Sep 2019

99.033

Oct 2019

99.756

Nov 2019

99.890

Dec 2019

99.716

Jan 2020

99.666

Feb 2020

99.355

Mar 2020

98.812

Apr 2020

98.492

May 2020

98.278

Jun 2020

98.501

Jul 2020

98.542

Aug 2020

98.478

Sep 2020

99.590

Oct 2020

100.103

Nov 2020

101.043

Dec 2020

101.377

Jan 2021

101.299

Feb 2021

102.681

Mar 2021

103.436

Apr 2021

104.748

May 2021

105.512

Jun 2021

105.840

Jul 2021

106.664

Aug 2021

107.833

Sep 2021

109.273

Oct 2021

112.872
Monthly percent change in employment in retail trade and department stores
MonthRetail tradeDepartment stores

Jan 2019

-0.1%0.2%

Feb 2019

-0.2-1.4

Mar 2019

-0.1-0.6

Apr 2019

-0.1-0.9

May 2019

-0.1-0.5

Jun 2019

-0.1-0.7

Jul 2019

0.0-0.9

Aug 2019

-0.1-1.4

Sep 2019

0.10.3

Oct 2019

0.20.0

Nov 2019

-0.20.4

Dec 2019

0.3-0.4

Jan 2020

-0.1-2.7

Feb 2020

0.00.3

Mar 2020

-0.8-0.6

Apr 2020

-14.5-25.3

May 2020

3.16.7

Jun 2020

6.314.1

Jul 2020

1.74.3

Aug 2020

1.72.3

Sep 2020

0.2-0.8

Oct 2020

0.70.2

Nov 2020

0.00.7

Dec 2020

0.2-0.6

Jan 2021

0.1-0.3

Feb 2021

0.10.5

Mar 2021

0.30.1

Apr 2021

-0.10.2

May 2021

0.40.9

Jun 2021

0.61.3

Jul 2021

0.00.3

Aug 2021

0.1-0.5

Sep 2021

0.40.5

Oct 2021

0.2-0.2
Indexes for labor productivity, hours worked, and output in retail trade
YearLabor productivityHours workedOutput

2007

100.000100.000100.000

2008

97.76597.65895.475

2009

98.29492.03290.461

2010

100.69492.66793.310

2011

101.39794.68696.008

2012

103.65595.67399.170

2013

108.08095.212102.905

2014

109.91997.268106.916

2015

113.48698.821112.148

2016

118.52598.636116.908

2017

120.71999.896120.593

2018

124.39399.783124.123

2019

130.36098.139127.934

2020

140.39294.650132.880
Average hours spent watching TV and playing sports, weekend days and holidays, 2019
ActivityHours

Watching TV (average of population)

3.36

Watching TV (average of those who watched TV)

4.17

Playing sports (average of population)

0.34

Playing sports (average of those who played sports)

1.94
Consumer Price Indexes for food at home and food away from home
MonthFood at homeFood away from home

Jan 2018

100.000100.000

Feb 2018

99.793100.243

Mar 2018

99.780100.352

Apr 2018

100.026100.594

May 2018

99.779100.929

Jun 2018

99.865101.113

Jul 2018

100.127101.229

Aug 2018

100.198101.421

Sep 2018

100.252101.645

Oct 2018

100.046101.738

Nov 2018

100.259102.029

Dec 2018

100.554102.437

Jan 2019

100.683102.789

Feb 2019

101.014103.153

Mar 2019

101.163103.342

Apr 2019

100.716103.676

May 2019

100.913103.894

Jun 2019

100.718104.232

Jul 2019

100.716104.443

Aug 2019

100.654104.669

Sep 2019

100.902104.940

Oct 2019

101.124105.139

Nov 2019

101.324105.310

Dec 2019

101.331105.611

Jan 2020

101.440106.000

Feb 2020

101.851106.236

Mar 2020

102.220106.395

Apr 2020

104.775106.550

May 2020

105.718106.942

Jun 2020

106.309107.496

Jul 2020

105.343108.002

Aug 2020

105.322108.309

Sep 2020

105.051108.911

Oct 2020

105.177109.210

Nov 2020

105.012109.342

Dec 2020

105.335109.751

Jan 2021

105.203110.122

Feb 2021

105.474110.180

Mar 2021

105.587110.311

Apr 2021

106.047110.649

May 2021

106.423111.258

Jun 2021

107.309112.047

Jul 2021

108.031112.923

Aug 2021

108.431113.405

Sep 2021

109.779114.013

Oct 2021

110.841114.965
Import price index for television and video receivers
MonthIndex

Jan 2011

100.000

Feb 2011

100.173

Mar 2011

100.173

Apr 2011

99.136

May 2011

98.964

Jun 2011

97.409

Jul 2011

97.064

Aug 2011

96.373

Sep 2011

95.855

Oct 2011

94.991

Nov 2011

93.092

Dec 2011

94.128

Jan 2012

94.819

Feb 2012

94.473

Mar 2012

93.955

Apr 2012

92.573

May 2012

92.573

Jun 2012

92.401

Jul 2012

92.401

Aug 2012

92.573

Sep 2012

92.228

Oct 2012

92.573

Nov 2012

90.155

Dec 2012

90.155

Jan 2013

89.810

Feb 2013

89.637

Mar 2013

88.256

Apr 2013

88.083

May 2013

87.910

Jun 2013

87.910

Jul 2013

87.392

Aug 2013

87.219

Sep 2013

85.838

Oct 2013

85.492

Nov 2013

85.492

Dec 2013

85.492

Jan 2014

85.320

Feb 2014

85.320

Mar 2014

85.147

Apr 2014

84.801

May 2014

84.283

Jun 2014

84.111

Jul 2014

83.074

Aug 2014

82.902

Sep 2014

83.074

Oct 2014

81.865

Nov 2014

81.865

Dec 2014

81.347

Jan 2015

79.965

Feb 2015

79.965

Mar 2015

79.965

Apr 2015

79.965

May 2015

79.620

Jun 2015

79.620

Jul 2015

79.620

Aug 2015

79.620

Sep 2015

79.620

Oct 2015

79.447

Nov 2015

79.275

Dec 2015

78.929

Jan 2016

78.756

Feb 2016

77.547

Mar 2016

77.375

Apr 2016

77.029

May 2016

76.857

Jun 2016

77.029

Jul 2016

76.857

Aug 2016

76.684

Sep 2016

76.684

Oct 2016

76.684

Nov 2016

76.684

Dec 2016

76.684

Jan 2017

76.166

Feb 2017

76.166

Mar 2017

75.820

Apr 2017

75.993

May 2017

75.993

Jun 2017

75.993

Jul 2017

75.993

Aug 2017

75.993

Sep 2017

75.820

Oct 2017

75.475

Nov 2017

75.302

Dec 2017

75.130

Jan 2018

75.130

Feb 2018

75.302

Mar 2018

74.784

Apr 2018

74.439

May 2018

74.266

Jun 2018

73.575

Jul 2018

72.884

Aug 2018

72.884

Sep 2018

72.712

Oct 2018

72.539

Nov 2018

72.366

Dec 2018

72.021

Jan 2019

71.330

Feb 2019

70.812

Mar 2019

70.466

Apr 2019

70.466

May 2019

70.294

Jun 2019

69.948

Jul 2019

69.775

Aug 2019

69.603

Sep 2019

69.603

Oct 2019

69.430

Nov 2019

69.085

Dec 2019

68.912

Jan 2020

69.430

Feb 2020

68.048

Mar 2020

67.358

Apr 2020

66.839

May 2020

66.667

Jun 2020

66.667

Jul 2020

66.494

Aug 2020

66.494

Sep 2020

66.321

Oct 2020

66.667

Nov 2020

67.358

Dec 2020

68.048

Jan 2021

68.739

Feb 2021

68.739

Mar 2021

68.566

Apr 2021

69.775

May 2021

70.639

Jun 2021

70.812

Jul 2021

73.402

Aug 2021

73.402

Sep 2021

74.439

Oct 2021

74.784
Quits, layoffs and discharges, and other job separations
MonthQuitsLayoffs and dischargesOther separations

Jan 2019

3,521,0001,689,000301,000

Feb 2019

3,543,0001,769,000353,000

Mar 2019

3,524,0001,721,000331,000

Apr 2019

3,494,0001,954,000313,000

May 2019

3,487,0001,776,000307,000

Jun 2019

3,527,0001,771,000316,000

Jul 2019

3,627,0001,826,000344,000

Aug 2019

3,591,0001,825,000306,000

Sep 2019

3,449,0001,982,000345,000

Oct 2019

3,414,0001,793,000359,000

Nov 2019

3,482,0001,788,000374,000

Dec 2019

3,487,0001,952,000354,000

Jan 2020

3,568,0001,788,000358,000

Feb 2020

3,430,0001,953,000332,000

Mar 2020

2,902,00013,046,000360,000

Apr 2020

2,107,0009,307,000368,000

May 2020

2,206,0002,096,000316,000

Jun 2020

2,646,0002,204,000331,000

Jul 2020

3,182,0001,845,000365,000

Aug 2020

2,987,0001,573,000342,000

Sep 2020

3,307,0001,555,000373,000

Oct 2020

3,352,0001,728,000347,000

Nov 2020

3,296,0002,123,000325,000

Dec 2020

3,407,0001,823,000352,000

Jan 2021

3,306,0001,724,000294,000

Feb 2021

3,383,0001,723,000323,000

Mar 2021

3,568,0001,525,000343,000

Apr 2021

3,992,0001,450,000360,000

May 2021

3,630,0001,353,000347,000

Jun 2021

3,870,0001,354,000389,000

Jul 2021

4,028,0001,423,000341,000

Aug 2021

4,270,0001,385,000378,000

Sep 2021

4,434,0001,375,000410,000

New Data on Balancing Family Needs with Work

Among the many challenges for today’s families is the balance between caregiving and the demands of working outside the home. Some workers are even sandwiched between the need to provide both childcare and eldercare. New information from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that about two out of three employees have paid time off available to meet these needs.

Interest among federal, state, and local policymakers in paid time off and other job flexibilities motivated the U.S. Department of Labor’s Women’s Bureau to sponsor an extra set of questions in the American Time Use Survey. The 2017–18 Leave and Job Flexibilities Module gives us data on the characteristics of wage and salary workers who have access to paid and unpaid leave in their jobs. The module also asked questions about workers who work at home and whether they have flexible work schedules. We also know more about workers who do not have access to leave and job flexibilities. Because we collected the data directly from workers, we could ask them about their experiences, such as the reasons they take leave, or don’t take it even when they need to, and why they work at home.

We now know that 66 percent of U.S. wage and salary workers were able to take paid leave from their jobs in 2017–18. Workers were most often able to use paid leave for a vacation and if they were sick or needed medical care. One area of interest is about people who provide unpaid eldercare. The survey showed that 64 percent of eldercare providers who were employed were able to use paid leave to provide elder caregiving. Another 28 percent of these caregivers were not able to take paid leave for this reason, and 8 percent didn’t know if their employer would allow them to use paid leave to provide eldercare.

Percent of workers with access to paid leave who could use it for the following reasons, 2017–18

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

We also have learned that 36 million workers (25 percent) sometimes worked at home, and they did so for different reasons. Twenty-four percent worked at home because of a personal preference, 23 percent did so to catch up on work, 22 percent worked at home to coordinate their work schedule with personal or family needs, and 16 percent did so because their job required it. Among those who sometimes worked at home, men and women had different reasons for doing so. Women were more likely than men to work at home to finish or catch up on work and to coordinate their work schedule with personal or family needs. Men were more likely than women to work at home because of a personal preference.

Percent of workers who work at home by main reason, 2017–18

Editor’s note: Data for this chart are available in the table below.

We published these results and more in two recent news releases. One news release focused on workers’ access to leave, their use of leave, and an unmet need for leave. The second focused on workers’ job flexibilities and work schedules.

These releases present data on:

  • Access to paid and unpaid time off
  • Use of paid and unpaid time off
  • Needing to take leave from a job but deciding not to take it
  • Flexible work hours
  • Knowing work schedule in advance
  • Working from home

The releases provide information by:

  • Gender
  • Age
  • Race
  • Hispanic or Latino ethnicity
  • Educational attainment
  • Full- or part-time status
  • Earnings

We also have data files that allow researchers to analyze the data and gain even more insights. Following the policies of BLS and the U.S. Census Bureau to protect the privacy of survey respondents, these data files do not have any information that could identify individual participants.

Percent of workers with access to paid leave who could use it for the following reasons, 2017–18
ReasonYesNoDon’t know

Vacation

95%5%0%

Own illness or medical care

9461

Illness or medical care of another family member

78166

Birth or adoption of a child

76159

Errands or personal reasons

70282

Childcare, other than for illness

65314

Eldercare

64288

Note: The estimates for “childcare, other than for illness” are for workers who were parents of household children under age 18. The estimates for “eldercare” are only for workers who were eldercare providers.

Percent of workers who work at home by main reason, 2017–18
ReasonTotalMenWomen

Personal preference

24%27%21%

Finish or catch up on work

232126

Coordinate work schedule with personal or family needs

222025

Job requires working at home

161616

Reduce commuting time or expense

9109

Weather

443

Other

221

Increasing Commuting Costs?

With Earth Day approaching, we have been wondering about increased costs for commuting to work. At BLS, we don’t have environmental cost statistics, but we do have worker costs.

Some employees don’t have to commute — they are able to work from home.

  • In 2015, the share of employed persons who did some or all of their work from home on days they worked was 24 percent. This is up from 19 percent in 2003.

An image showing someone working at home.

 

But a large number of the workforce still travels to and from a physical workplace, day in and day out. If you do need to trek into work, over the last 10 years, changes in consumer prices for a couple modes of commuting follow.

If you go by car:

First you need a vehicle.

  • New cars: Up 6 percent

Next you need to fuel it.

  • Gasoline: Down 7 percent

But before you can put it on the road…

  • State motor vehicle registration and license fees: Up 27 percent
  • Motor vehicle insurance: Up 56 percent

And you may have to pay for parking once you get to work.

  • Parking and other fees: Up 38 percent

An image showing cars in rush hour traffic in an urban area.

Those in an urban area may have another option to driving:

  • Intracity transportation (bus, rail): Up 35 percent

And one last option:

  • Human-powered commuting (walking to work): No increase!

We hope these data help you make wise decisions on your commuting choices. If nothing else, you may decide to set up a car pool — to help pay for parking!